After making things harder on himself than necessary, Gov. Pat Quinn found the right place to land Monday by signing a city pension reform deal negotiated by Mayor Rahm Emanuel.

It’s really the only sensible outcome, although I’m sure Quinn was torn by a populist impulse to save himself some grief and veto the bill in the name of Chicago property taxpayers.

In the end, Quinn recognized the pension legislation itself does not raise city property taxes, although it definitely increases the likelihood that will happen given Emanuel’s stated intentions.

It was understandable back in April when Quinn balked at the original version of the pension bill, which tried to lay responsibility for a property tax hike on the Legislature and governor instead of the City Council and mayor where it belongs.

But then the governor got carried away with his rhetoric and painted himself in a corner with his vow of “no can do” on using the property tax increase to pay for it.

There should be no doubt: This legislation is going to lead to a tax increase in Chicago, probably including property taxes, just maybe not this year if aldermen get their say in postponing it.

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