Sean Spicer, a Republican strategist tapped to be President-elect Donald Trump’s press secretary, confirmed a widely held notion to a crowd at the University of Chicago’s Institute of Politics Wednesday evening.

His boss’ Twitter account is unscripted and all his own.

In a discussion with David Axelrod, the architect of Barack Obama’s successful presidential campaigns and director of the institute, Spicer said Trump’s Twitter is the first thing he checks in the morning because it has such an impact on the news cycle.

Sean Spicer, incoming press secretary for President-elect Donald Trump, said he doesn't see Trump's Tweets in advance: "Once in awhile he says 'I'm going to Tweet something,' or, 'Hey, what do you think about this?'  He drives the train on this," Spicer told an audience Wednesday at the University of Chicago. | Associated Press file photo

Sean Spicer, incoming press secretary for President-elect Donald Trump, said he doesn’t see Trump’s Tweets in advance: “Once in awhile he says ‘I’m going to Tweet something,’ or, ‘Hey, what do you think about this?’ He drives the train on this,” Spicer told an audience Wednesday at the University of Chicago. | Associated Press file photo

“You saw the House vote the other day,” Spicer said.

Earlier this week, House Republicans voted to neuter a congressional ethics oversight board.

The next day, Trump tweeted to his 18.7 million followers: “With all that Congress has to work on, do they really have to make the weakening of the Independent Ethics Watchdog, as unfair as it may be, their number one act and priority. Focus on tax reform, healthcare and so many other things of far greater importance!”

That effort was dropped soon after Trump’s tweet — and amid an avalanche of angry calls and messages to legislators from their constituents.

Axelrod asked Spicer if the unpredictability of Trump’s tweets has ever given him “a sense of dread.” Spicer said no, “because that’s what’s going to drive the news.”

Just as the interview began, a heckler urged people to “Just stand up and resist” and to “Go out in to the streets and stop this” before being escorted out.