Chance the Rapper is going to meet with Bruce the governor.

After Gov. Bruce Rauner tweeted his congratulations to the Chicago rapper and anti-gun violence activist for his Grammy wins, Chance the Rapper tweeted back, requesting a meeting.

“Congrats to ‪@Chancetherapper for making history as an independent artist and taking home 3 Grammys,” the governor tweeted. “IL is proud that you’re one of our own.”

Chance the Rapper — the 23-year-old West Chatham native turned hip hop star — responded:

“Thank you Governor, I would love to have meeting with you this week if possible.”

And the governor says he is up for it: “Let’s set up a meeting soon. Looking forward to our conversation,” Rauner tweeted back.

Recording artist Chance the Rapper accepts the Best Rap Album award for 'Coloring Book' onstage during The 59th GRAMMY Awards at STAPLES Center on February 12, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images for NARAS)

Recording artist Chance the Rapper accepts the Best Rap Album award for ‘Coloring Book’ onstage during The 59th GRAMMY Awards at STAPLES Center on February 12, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images for NARAS)

Chance — whose real name is Chancellor Bennett — made history Sunday night for his best rap album win for “Coloring Book.” His album marked the first time the award has gone to a streamed-only album. A rule change last year allowed streamed-only recordings to be eligible for nominations.

Chance has picked up a giant fan base while releasing musical endeavors for free. His second mixtape “Acid Rap” has been downloaded more than a million times, and he’s never signed with a label.

The rapper — whose dad served as deputy chief of staff to Mayor Emanuel — picked up three awards at the Grammys, including best new artist and best rap performance.

Chicago got a shout out in Chance’s acceptance speech for best new artist: “I wanna thank God for my mother and my father who supported me since I was young … and for Chicago!”

The rapper is likely to take up Chicago’s gun violence epidemic with the governor, of which Chance has been an outspoken advocate for quelling the problem. He was also appointed to the board of the DuSable Museum of African American History last month. The museum cited Chance’s work in promoting racial justice and anti-violence on both social media and in events.

In Rauner’s State of the State address last month, he lamented Chicago’s gun violence epidemic: “The violence occurring in Chicago every night is intolerable; we’ve got to bring it to an end.”