WASHINGTON — Former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani, one of Donald Trump’s top advisers, said Sunday — without providing any evidence — that he would “have to be a moron” to believe the elections in Chicago and Philadelphia will be “fair.”

“To tell me that I think the election in Philadelphia and Chicago is going to be fair, I would have to be a moron to say that,” Giuliani said on CNN’s “State of the Union” in an interview with anchor Jake Tapper.

“I would have to dislearn everything I learned in 40 years of being a politician.”

Giuliani is continuing an assertion from Trump, also with no evidence, that there is a conspiracy, assisted by the media, for the election to be “rigged” so he will be defeated by Hillary Clinton. Voter fraud will help Democrats, not Republicans, Giuliani asserted.

Journalists are reporting on Trump’s latest struggles in the closing month of the campaign from claims made by women about his sexual predatory behavior, his own bragging about his sexual advances and his poor performances in two presidential debates.

There are also stories about Clinton, triggered by a trove of leaked WikiLeaks emails, with details surfacing about Clinton’s relationships with the Clinton Foundation and her donors getting perks from the State Department and her paid Wall Street speeches.

As a practical matter, Clinton has well outpolled Trump in every Illinois survey and is on track to win blue state Illinois with help from heavily Democratic Chicago. The last time a GOP presidential candidate won Illinois was in 1988.

Tapper started the discussion about Trump’s “rigged election” allegations by asking Giuliani, “Why does he say, if I lose Pennsylvania, it will be because that it’s stolen, Pennsylvania, a state that hasn’t gone Republican since 1988?”

Replied Giuliani, “There are — there are — there are a few places, and not many in the swing states, there are a few places where they have been notorious for stealing votes, Pennsylvania, Chicago. There have been places where a lot of cheating has gone on over the years.”

Giuliani turned to the matter of dead people voting and past voter fraud problems in Chicago more than two decades ago. “I remember a case when I was associate attorney general where 720 dead people voted in Chicago in the 1982 election.” Dead people, he said, “generally vote for Democrats, rather than Republicans.”

A big win moots voter fraud issues.

Said Giuliani, “Look, if she wins Illinois by 8 percent or he wins Illinois by 8 percent, then that cheating is not going to make any difference.”