Suit: Woman lost sense of taste, smell after Riverdale officer used stun gun on her

SHARE Suit: Woman lost sense of taste, smell after Riverdale officer used stun gun on her
SHARE Suit: Woman lost sense of taste, smell after Riverdale officer used stun gun on her

A woman who suffered traumatic brain injury and lost her sense of taste and smell after a south suburban policeman used a stun gun on her last April filed a federal lawsuit Thursday against the village and officer, alleging excessive force was used.

On April 12, 2014, Mallory Pickett was involved in an altercation with the mother of her brother’s child at Riverdale Library, 208 W. 144th St. in Riverdale, according to the lawsuit. Upon police arrival, both women ran away from the scene, but an officer deployed a stun gun on Pickett, causing her to fall backwards and hit her head on the concrete, according to the suit.

As a result, Pickett was taken to MetroSouth Medical Center in Blue Island, where she was diagnosed with traumatic brain injury, a skull fracture, subarachnoid hemorrhage, a concussion, pneumocephalus, a back injury and Bell’s Palsy, the suit said.

Bell’s Palsy is paralysis or weakness of muscles on the side of a person’s face and affects the senses of taste and smell.

The suit alleges the officer used the Taser without verbal warning or provocation, the suit said.

The two-count suit claims excessive force was used and seeks more than $75,000.

The Village of Riverdale and its police department could not be immediately reached Thursday evening.

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