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Man gets 43 years for fatally stabbing teacher during Naperville bar fight

A 31-year-old west suburban man has been sentenced to 43 years in prison for fatally stabbing an elementary school teacher and stabbing two other men during a bar fight in Naperville in 2012.

On March 11, a jury convicted Daniel J. Olaska of Naperville of first-degree murder and unlawful use of weapon for killing 24-year-old Shaun Wild, a Naperville elementary school teacher. DuPage County Chief Judge Kathryn Creswell sentenced him to 43 years on Wednesday.

“On Feb. 2, 2012, Daniel Olaska murdered Shaun Wild, a fine young man who served his community as an elementary school teacher,” DuPage County state’s attorney Robert Berlin said in a statement. “The murder of Shaun Wild was a senseless tragedy that shook not only the Wild family, but shook the entire community as well.”

About 9 p.m. that night, Olaska went to Frankie’s Blue Room in Naperville and was sitting in a booth with William Hayes, whom he had just met. About 12:45 a.m., following an argument, “Olaska stabbed Hayes in the chest with a pocket knife,” a statement from the state’s attorney’s office said.

Olaska then got up, and as Wild attempted to stop him from leaving, “Olaska stabbed Wild in the chest, penetrating his heart,” prosecutors said.

Olaska again tried to leave the bar, but was stopped by Rafael Castenada, a bouncer, who ended up being stabbed in the arm by Olaska, according to prosecutors.

Naperville police arrived and arrested Olaska, who has remained in custody since his arrest. Wild died from his injuries, while both Hayes and Castenada have recovered.

Berlin said. “Fueled by alcohol, rejection and the confidence of a 3½ inch blade of a knife, Mr. Olaska fatally stabbed Shaun with that knife, piercing his heart from front to back. In his murderous rampage, Olaska also seriously injured two other men. Thankfully they have recovered.”

The sentence came to 40 years for murder and three years for the weapon charge, to be served consecutively. By law, Olaska must serve 100 percent of the murder sentence, but will get day-for-day credit on the weapon conviction,” prosecutors said.

“While Shaun is no longer with us, I am sure his memory will live on in the hearts of his family, friends and students who loved him. With today’s sentence, it is my sincerest hope that they will be able to put this horrible chapter of their lives behind them and move forward with their memories of Shaun to comfort them in his absence.”