Kyle Schwarber named Cubs minor league player of the month

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Kane County’s Kyle Schwarber signs autographs for fans before the game against the Peoria Chiefs at Fifth Third Bank Ballpark in Geneva in this Jul. 3, 2014, file photo. | Mike Mantucca / For Sun-Times Media

Kane County’s Kyle Schwarber signs autographs for fans before the game against the Peoria Chiefs at Fifth Third Bank Ballpark in Geneva in this Jul. 3, 2014, file photo. | Mike Mantucca / For Sun-Times Media

White-hot Double-A catcher Kyle Schwarber was named the Cubs’ minor league player of the month on Wednesday.

Schwarber, 22, hit .297 with two doubles, eight homers, 18 runs and 17 RBI in 28 games at Double-A Tennessee in May. He walked 24 times to help attain a .443 on-base percentage.

Schwarber ranked first in the Southern League in walks and second in homers. He led all Cubs prospects in homers, walks, slugging and OPS.

The catcher has been so good in his early time at Double-A that he’s even outpacing Kris Bryant’s numbers at that level.

The Cubs drafted Schwarber fourth overall in last year’s draft.

Ryan Williams was named the pitcher of the month after going 2-1 with a 1.59 ERA in five starts for Class A South Bend. He was recently promoted to Double-A Tennessee and will remain in the Smokies’ rotation.

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