Archbishop Cupich accepts pallium at Holy Name Cathedral

SHARE Archbishop Cupich accepts pallium at Holy Name Cathedral
SHARE Archbishop Cupich accepts pallium at Holy Name Cathedral

Archbishop Blase Cupich kneeled humbly Sunday inside Holy Name Cathedral and accepted the pallium bestowed to him by Pope Francis.

The pallium, a scarf or vestment Cupich will wear while celebrating Mass, was actually delivered by Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano, who draped it over Cupich’s shoulders in what Cupich later called a “simple yet solemn act.”

“The pallium . . . is a sign of the bond we in Chicago share with the successor of St. Peter,” Cupich told parishioners in his homily.

The ceremony took place during an afternoon service in front of the altar at the cathedral. It is part of the installation of a church’s new bishop.

While it has been customary for the pope to conduct the rite in Rome, Francis decided new bishops should receive the pallium in their home churches. Cupich said after the service that decision “brought home everything.”

He also said he was encouraged by the applause that filled the sanctuary when the ceremony ended.

“I know there are other people who are going to be there to help me to carry on this task,” Cupich said.

It’s been nearly a year since Francis named Cupich the new archbishop of Chicago, and nine months since his installation.

The white pallium is about 2 inches wide, contains wool from two lambs blessed by the pope during the feast of St. Agnes and features six black crosses. Three of those crosses are ornamented with a gold pin to symbolize the three nails of Jesus Christ’s crucifixion.

Pendants hanging from the front and back are tipped with black satin to resemble a lamb’s hoof.

Archbishop Blase Cupich receives the pallium from Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano, Apostolic Nuncio to the United States. | Kevin Tanaka/For the Sun-Times

Archbishop Blase Cupich receives the pallium from Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano, Apostolic Nuncio to the United States. | Kevin Tanaka/For the Sun-Times

“It is placed on the shoulders, reminding the one who wears it — and the entire church he serves — that we are a community that goes after the lost sheep,” Cupich said. “Not only those who have strayed, but those who are ignored, forgotten, those who are overlooked.”

The ceremony played out quickly in front of an audience that included House Speaker Michael Madigan and Senate President John Cullerton. After Vigano spoke briefly to the parishioners, he sat down beside Cupich at the altar.

Cupich stood and kneeled before Vigano, who placed the pallium over his shoulders.

Afterward, Cupich hugged Vigano and turned to the parishioners, who gave him a standing ovation.

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