Cubs World Series ticket watch: Prices still on the rise

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Cubs fans celebrate outside Wrigley Field after the win Saturday over the Los Angeles Dodgers sent the team to its first World Series since 1945. | Ashlee Rezin / Sun-Times

Want to see the Cubs in the World Series but need to stretch a buck? Go to Game 1 or 2 in Cleveland, where the cheapest seats are a modest (!) $690 for Game 2 at Progressive Field.

That’s a bargain compared with $1,900 for Game 3, the first World Series game at Wrigley Field, according to data Monday from ticket reseller Stubhub.com.

On average, tickets to games at Wrigley are selling for about four times the price of games in Cleveland, with more than 20 percent of shoppers on the website from the Chicago area.

Another ticket reseller, Seatgeek.com, says seats two rows behind home plate for Game 3 are listed for $25,000.

TicketiQ, a website that aggregates resale prices from multiple sites, said the average sale price is $2,984 — about triple the price for tickets to the next-most expensive World Series ever, the 2010 Texas Rangers-San Francisco Giants matchup.

Average prices on Stubhub.com Monday:

Median price sold:

Game 1: $690

Game 2: $667

Game 3: $3,099

Game 4: $3,650

Game 5: $3,572

Game 6: $1,025

Game 7: $1,125

Cheapest available:

Game 1: $705

Game 2: $650

Game 3: $1,900

Game 4: $2,529

Game 5: $2,300

Game 6: $999

Game 7: $1,450

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