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Day games, sun and warmth finally on their way to Wrigley Field

Cubs pitcher Pedro Strop celebrates after beating the Rockies 6-2 in a day game April 16 at Wrigley Field. (Photo by Dylan Buell/Getty Images)

Two of the most beautiful words known to man: day baseball.

When the Cubs and the Nationals face off for a four-game series at Wrigley Field starting Thursday, three of the games will be played in actual daylight. Daylight is that period of the 24-hour cycle in which the sun is out. The sun is the orange orb that sometimes shows itself in the sky.

The orange orb might actually pump the temperature above 70.

After Thursday’s 7:05 p.m. start, the next three games begin at 1:20 p.m., 3:05 p.m. and 1:20 p.m., respectively. That’s not unusual. The Cubs often play during the day on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays when they’re at home. The difference is that we have moved into May, which is a much more congenial month weather-wise than April is. April is unsure how it feels about Chicago, and the feeling is mutual.

Warmth is on its way. Friday’s high is predicted to be 79. Now it feels like baseball season.

Ten of the Cubs’ 15 home games this month are day games. The White Sox play five of their 15 May games during the day.

Major-league players generally don’t like day games. Their body clocks are set for night games, and Cubs players have complained for years that they are at a competitive disadvantage by playing so many day games at Wrigley Field. To which I say: Tough.

Playing baseball during the day at Wrigley is special. Whatever you think of the aging facility and its ongoing rehab, it’s hard to argue that sitting in a seat and beholding the field, the ivy and the scoreboard isn’t the beginning of a religious experience. The players should get on board.

During his introductory press conference, Cubs president Theo Epstein said baseball is better during the day. It was like an Alabama politician saying his favorite color is crimson red, but it was also very true. Seeing a baseball under natural light is better.

Day baseball is here, so is the warmth. Don’t forget sunscreen.