Addison Russell didn’t ask Jason Heyward for anything in return for No. 22

SHARE Addison Russell didn’t ask Jason Heyward for anything in return for No. 22
SHARE Addison Russell didn’t ask Jason Heyward for anything in return for No. 22

Cubs infielder Addison Russell was so excited by the team’s signing of Jason Heyward that he offered to give up his No. 22 without asking anything in return.

Shortly after Heyward – No. 22 throughout his entire six-year career – signed with Cubs, Russell said via Twitter that he would have no problem changing numbers.

At his introductory press conference Tuesday, Heyward said he was appreciative, but surprised that the rookie didn’t ask for anything in return for the number, which Heyward wears to honor a fallen high-school teammate, according to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

Perhaps Russell should research the value of a number before redeeming that IOU.

When Darrelle Revis joined the Tampa Bay Buccaneers back in 2013, he reportedly paid a teammate $50,000 for the No. 24. Roger Clemens gave Carlos Delgado $15,000 and a Rolex for No. 21 when he joined the Blue Jays in 1997 and Tom Glavine paid for a baby nursery for the Mets’Joe McEwing in 2003, according to CBS.

Heyward ought to be willing to pay. After all, he did just sign a $184 million deal.

23 players who played for both the Cubs and Cardinals

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