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Trade Kyle Schwarber if it means a World Series for the Cubs

(Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)

Let me get this straight: You wouldn’t trade Kyle Schwarber for Aroldis Chapman or Andrew Miller or both because you’re all about sustained success, not about winning one measly World Series this year?

I don’t want to say people are getting ahead of themselves with the whole Cubs dynasty thing, but shouldn’t the goal be, I don’t know, winning a title for the first time since 1908?

It’s as if amnesia has set in or the Cubs and their fans have run through the poppy fields and fallen into a deep, blue-tinted slumber. The goal is to win a World Series. One. You can’t win two or three without winning one.

It’s great to want to be great for a long time, but it has been awful being awful for 107 years.

Schwarber, as any misty-eyed Cubs fan knows, is out for the season with a knee injury. He was good last season, his rookie year, and even better in the playoffs. But viewing him as untouchable is pure silliness. If trading one young player to dramatically improve the chances of a World Series title this year is a betrayal of The Plan, then it wasn’t much of a plan.

The Yankees think Schwarber, a challenged defender, would make a great designated hitter, and they reportedly are willing to move either Chapman or Miller or both of the relievers.

If the Cubs think a trade would guarantee them a World Series this season, even if it involves a rental player, they should do it. All we’ve heard for the past three years is how much depth the franchise has. If it’s not going to be used at times for trades, what’s the point? And what was the point of all that losing if not to build up draft picks to be used later on the field or in a trade?

The same thinking applies to shortstop Addison Russell. Javy Baez is a better baseball player. Again, if you’re going to fall in love with all your young players, then The Plan isn’t what it was made out to be.

I like Schwarber a lot. When he got hurt, the Cubs lost a piece of their heart. But people need to keep their eye on the ball. The fan emphasis on being patient, on having “controllable’’ players, is all GM-wanna-be stuff. The idea is to win, now.

Do the Cubs believe that, as constituted, they can win the World Series? If the answer is yes, then they should stand pat. If the answer is no, then it’s their responsibility to make a trade, even if it means moving a valuable young player.

Sounds like a plan.