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Clinton becomes first woman to win major party nomination

The delegates from Wisconsin cast their votes for President of the United States during the second day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia , Tuesday, July 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

PHILADELPHIA — Hillary Clinton made history on Tuesday in becoming the first woman of a major party to be nominated for president of the United States at the Democratic National Convention.

The nomination came a day after Clinton and Bernie Sanders’ camps worked hard to unite supporters— and Sanders himself delivered a message of unity.

South Dakota clinched the nomination for Clinton.

Sanders joined the Vermont delegation as it cast four of its 26 votes for Clinton, after Clinton had already clinched the nomination.

The Vermont senator then took to the microphone and moved that the convention nominate Clinton by voice vote.

“I vote Hillary Clinton be selected the nominee,” he said.

Former Democratic presidential candidate Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders is greeted by the delegation from Vermont during the roll call on Day 2 of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, July 26, 2016. /
Former Democratic presidential candidate Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders is greeted by the delegation from Vermont during the roll call on Day 2 of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, July 26, 2016. / AFP PHOTO / Timothy A. CLARYTIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images

Many states allowed Sanders’ delegates to announce their votes, including Sanders’ brother Larry, who offered an emotional tribute to their parents as he cast the vote for Democrats Abroad.

Illinois House Speaker Mike Madigan took the mic when it was Illinois’ turn to cast its vote, calling the state the home to President Obama, Sen. Dick Durbin and Rep. Tammy Duckworth.

Then, as a sign of unity in a state with plenty of Sanders supporters, Madigan handed over the mic to Clem Balanoff, who ran Sanders’ campaign in Illinois. Balanoff called Sanders “a true progressive and the author of the new political revolution.”

When it was time for Clinton’s longtime friend, Betsy Ebeling, to cast her home state votes, there were tears in her eyes: “This one’s for you, Hil.”

Illinois cast 98 votes for Clinton and 74 for Sanders.

Clinton will officially accept the nomination on Thursday.

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Maryland Sen. Barbara Mikulski — the longest serving woman in Congress – delivered the first nominating speech for Clinton: “She wants to break the barriers to opportunity so you won’t have barriers.”

“With Hillary Clinton as president and a strong Senate majority by her side, we’ll keep the American Dream alive for a new generation. And that torch in the harbor of the city in which I live, it won’t flicker, it won’t fade, it will burn brightly in the heart of every American.”

Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard delivered Sanders’ nominating speech. “Because this is a movement fueled by love, it can never be stopped or defeated,” Gabbard said.

There was talk of unity by Paul Feeney, Sanders’ Massachusetts and Connecticut director, who pointed out that Clinton supporters raised “Bernie” signs as Sanders took the stage on Monday night.

“We should be proud to not only share this moment together but to truly build this movement together,” Feeney said to some boos.

There were more “Hillary” chants in the arena than Monday, when many Sanders supporters booed speakers. Many on Tuesday carried signs that read “A future to believe in,” and “Do the most good.”