Bears fan hilariously trolls John Fox in televised game against Eagles

SHARE Bears fan hilariously trolls John Fox in televised game against Eagles
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John Fox is entering what is likely to be his last week as the Bears’ head coach. (AP)

Things are not looking well for Bears coach John Fox.

During an embarrassing 31-3 loss to the Eagles on Sunday, a Bears fan trolled Fox in a creative and hilarious way.

The fan held up a giant “FireFox” web browser logo after former Bears wide receiver Alshon Jeffery scored a touchdown for the Eagles.

So either this is the fan’s favorite web browser or he’s really demanding the Bears oust Fox at the end of this season. I’m putting money on the latter.

This Bears fan wasn’t the first to use the web browser logo to put pressure on the Bears front office. And fans don’t appear to be backing down anytime soon.

Sun-Times Bears reporter Mark Potash changed his Twitter avatar to the “FireFox” logo after the Bears’ brutal 26-13 loss to the Packers this month.

One fan altered the logo to include Fox’s face.

Fox’s coaching future is inevitable. He has yet to have a winning season in Chicago since he took the position in 2015. Fox’s record also speaks for itself. The Bears are 12-31 during his tenure, and the team will likely finish in last-place in the NFC North for the third consecutive season.

Look on the bright side, Fox. At least the fanbase hasn’t put forward a crowdfunding effort for a giant billboard near your home turf, Soldier Field, calling for your firing.

Follow me on Twitter @madkenney.

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