rafathwaheed031717.png

Rafath Waheed | DuPage County state’s attorney’s office photo

Woman accused of forging petitions for DuPage college board seat

SHARE Woman accused of forging petitions for DuPage college board seat
SHARE Woman accused of forging petitions for DuPage college board seat

A 61-year-old woman was charged Wednesday with submitting forged documents in an effort to obtain a seat on the College of DuPage Board of Trustees.

Rafath Waheed, of west suburban Lisle, made photocopies of signatures on completed application forms and later notarized the forged petitions as authentic, according to the DuPage County state’s attorney’s office.

The scheme was uncovered during a hearing that dealt with an objection filed against her petitions, prosecutors said.

Waheed is charged with two counts of forgery, two counts of issuing a forged document, and four counts of perjury, all felonies, according to prosecutors. She was released Thursday after posting $1,000 bail. Her next court appearance is scheduled for April 12.

Waheed withdrew from the race during a Jan. 10 hearing with the College of DuPage Board of Trustees where she admitted photocopying petitions that were included in her candidacy filing.

Three seats are up for grabs in the upcoming College of DuPage Board of Trustees election, which is scheduled for April 4. No incumbents are seeking reelection.

The Latest
In one attack, three men, 36, 25 and 24, were in a car in the 8500 block of South Commercial Avenue about 5:20 a.m. when a dark colored SUV stopped next to them and someone inside opened fire, police said.
MLB teams have surged far ahead of NHL teams in terms of information gathering, processing and utilizing in decision-making. With Greenberg, a former Cubs executive, as their new associate general manager, the Hawks hope to adopt baseball’s advances.
A Greek house appeals to the very sociable straight-A college freshman, but her close-minded mother won’t hear of it.
Last year, the quarterbacks room wasn’t designed to serve Fields alone.
Without changes, the flood insurance program will collapse, and property owners will be on their own.