police_lights91_300x18816.jpg

Sun-Times file photo

Elderly woman killed, 4 others injured in crash near Hinckley

SHARE Elderly woman killed, 4 others injured in crash near Hinckley
SHARE Elderly woman killed, 4 others injured in crash near Hinckley

A 77-year-old woman was killed and four other people were injured in a crash Sunday afternoon in the far western suburbs.

A 61-year-old man was driving a 2006 Toyota Sequoia west on McGirr Road when he did not stop for a stop sign and struck a 2009 Lincoln MKX heading north on Hinckley Road at 1:53 p.m., according to the DeKalb County sheriff’s office.

The front seat passenger in the Toyota, 77-year-old Manivanh Chanhourack of Somonauk, was ejected from the SUV and pronounced dead, according to the sheriff’s office. She was not wearing a seat belt.

The driver of the Sequoia was also injured and taken to Delnor Hospital in Geneva, according to the sheriff’s office. A back seat passenger, a 52-year-old woman, was flown in a helicopter to St. Anthony Hospital in Rockford, where her condition stabilized.

The 67-year-old man driving the Lincoln and his passenger, a 65-year-old woman, both St. Charles residents, were taken to Kishwaukee Hospital in DeKalb, according to the sheriff’s office.

The 61-year-old driver of the Toyota was cited for disobeying a stop sign.

The Latest
The 34-year-old was crossing the street just before 8:30 p.m. in the 2900 block of West Columbus Avenue when she was struck by a black SUV.
“That’s where you build fandom, grow revenue, and that’s where all the players will benefit versus adding a roster spot here and there.”
Reflecting on one of the most iconic photos of his presidency, former President Obama said, “I think this picture embodied one of the hopes that I had when I first started running for office.”
Four cities bid for the 2024 Democratic convention by the Friday deadline: Chicago, New York, Houston and Atlanta.
The Alpha and Delta variant waves left 342 Chicagoans dead in less vaccinated parts of the city. That toll could have been 75% lower if more people had been inoculated, University of Chicago Medicine researchers found.