ap17173571395884.jpg

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell warns he may work a deal with Democrats to improve the Affordable Care Act if his fellow Republicans do not support a GOP plan to repeal the ACA. | J. Scott Applewhite/Associated Press

Senate GOP releases bill to cut Medicaid, alter Obamacare

SHARE Senate GOP releases bill to cut Medicaid, alter Obamacare
SHARE Senate GOP releases bill to cut Medicaid, alter Obamacare

WASHINGTON — Senate Republicans released their long-awaited bill Thursday to dismantle much of Barack Obama’s health care law, proposing to cut Medicaid for low-income Americans and erase tax boosts that Obama imposed on high-earners and medical companies to finance his expansion of coverage.

The bill would provide less-generous tax credits to help people buy insurance and let states get waivers to ignore some coverage standards that “Obamacare” requires of insurers. And it would end the tax penalties under Obama’s law on people who don’t buy insurance — the so-called individual mandate — and on larger companies that don’t offer coverage to their employees.

The measure represents the Senate GOP’s effort to achieve a top tier priority for President Donald Trump and virtually all Republican members of Congress. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., hopes to push it through his chamber next week, but solid Democratic opposition — and complaints from at least a half-dozen Republicans — have left its fate unclear.

By Thursday afternoon, Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., had said he and three other GOP senators oppose the bill as written — enough to put its passage in jeopardy.

SWEET: Illinois comments on the GOP plan READ THE BILL: Full text of GOP draft bill is below

But McConnell was undeterred.

“We have to act,” McConnell said on the Senate floor. “Because Obamacare is a direct attack on the middle class, and American families deserve better than its failing status quo.”

Democrats gathered on the Senate floor and defended Obama’s 2010 overhaul.

Among them was Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., who said the GOP plan endangers the fiscal health of Illinois hospitals and predicted that “not a single medical advocacy group in Illinois” will be for the bill.

Noting that President Donald Trump called the legislation that passed the House “mean,” Durbin said, “you can put a lace collar on a pit bull, and it’s still a mean dog.”

Other Democrats from Illinois joined Durbin in bashing the bill.

People are removed from a sit-in outside of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s office as they protest proposed cuts to Medicaid, Thursday, June 22, 2017 on Capitol Hill in Washington.  | Jacquelyn Martin/Associated Press

People are removed from a sit-in outside of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s office as they protest proposed cuts to Medicaid, Thursday, June 22, 2017 on Capitol Hill in Washington. | Jacquelyn Martin/Associated Press

Democrats said GOP characterizations of the law as failing are wrong and said the Republican plan would boot millions off coverage and leave others facing higher out-of-pocket costs.

“We live in the wealthiest country on earth. Surely we can do better than what the Republican health care bill promises,” said Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y.

Some conservative and moderate GOP senators, too, have complained about McConnell’s proposal, the secrecy with which he drafted it and the speed with which he’d like to whisk it to passage. McConnell has only a thin margin of error: The bill would fail if just three of the Senate’s 52 GOP senators oppose it.

Sen. Dean Heller, R-Nev., facing a tough re-election fight next year, said he had “serious concerns’ about the bill’s Medicaid reductions.

“If the bill is good for Nevada, I’ll vote for it and if it’s not, I won’t,” said Heller, whose state added 200,000 additional people under Obama’s law.

The House approved its version of the bill last month. Though he lauded its passage in a Rose Garden ceremony, Trump last week privately called the House measure “mean” and called on senators to make their version more “generous.”

A few dozen protesters opposed to the repeal of Obamacare gathered at Federal Plaza in the Loop on Thursday. | Rachel Hinton/For the Sun-Times

A few dozen protesters opposed to the repeal of Obamacare gathered at Federal Plaza in the Loop on Thursday. | Rachel Hinton/For the Sun-Times

At the White House on Thursday, Trump expressed hope for quick action.

“We’ll hopefully get something done, and it will be something with heart and very meaningful,” he said.

The bill would phase out the extra money Obama’s law provides to states that have expanded coverage under the federal-state Medicaid program for low-income people. The additional funds would continue through 2020, and be gradually reduced until they are entirely eliminated in 2024.

Ending Obama’s expansion has been a major problem for some GOP senators. Some from states that have expanded the program have battled to prolong the phase-out, while conservative Republicans have sought to halt the funds quickly.

Beginning in 2020, the Senate measure would also limit the federal funds states get each year for Medicaid. The program currently gives states all the money needed to cover eligible recipients and procedures.

The Senate bill would also reduce subsidies now provided to help people without workplace coverage get private health insurance, said Caroline Pearson, a senior vice president of the health care consulting firm Avalare Health.

Unlike the House bill, which bases its subsidies for private insurance on age, the Senate bill uses age and income. That focuses financial assistance on people with lower incomes.

Pearson said those subsidies will be smaller than under current law. That’s because they’re keyed to the cost of a bare-bones plan, and because additional help now provided for deductibles and copayments would be discontinued.

Under Obama’s law, “many of those people would have gotten much more generous plans,” she said.

The bill would let states get waivers to ignore some coverage requirements under Obama’s law, such as specific health services insurers must now cover. States could not get exemptions to Obama’s prohibition against charging higher premiums for some people with pre-existing medical conditions, but the subsidies would be lower, Pearson said, making coverage less unaffordable.

Like the House bill, the Senate measure would block federal payments to Planned Parenthood. Many Republicans have long fought that organization because it provides abortions.

The Senate would also provide $50 billion over the next four years that states could use in an effort to shore up insurance markets around the country.

For the next two years, it would also provide money that insurers use to help lower out-of-pocket costs for millions of lower income people. Trump has been threatening to discontinue those payments, and some insurance companies have cited uncertainty over those funds as reasons why they are abandoning some markets and boosting premiums.

The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office said the House bill would cause 23 million people to lose coverage by 2026. The budget office’s analysis of the Senate measure is expected in the next few days.

Protesters had to be carried away from outside McConnell’s office in the Capitol. There also were protesters in Chicago.

Indivisible Chicago, along with Doctors for America, rallied against the American Health Care Act at Federal Plaza Thursday afternoon. Speakers pleaded with Trump and Republican representatives and senators from Illinois to “heal, not repeal” the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.

David Zoltan, who came to the protest after getting his leg amputated below the knee, said Medicaid reductions in the bill could cost people their lives.

“It was too important to not show up and not put a face to the billions of Americans who are disabled,” Zoltan said. “These people, like me, want to have a normal life just like any other American. This is about making sure that community had a voice today.”

Contributing: Lynn Sweet, Rachel Hinton

Senate health care bill by jroneill on Scribd

The Latest
“That’s where you build fandom, grow revenue, and that’s where all the players will benefit versus adding a roster spot here and there.”
Reflecting on one of the most iconic photos of his presidency, former President Obama said, “I think this picture embodied one of the hopes that I had when I first started running for office.”
Four cities bid for the 2024 Democratic convention by the Friday deadline: Chicago, New York, Houston and Atlanta.
The Alpha and Delta variant waves left 342 Chicagoans dead in less vaccinated parts of the city. That toll could have been 75% lower if more people had been inoculated, University of Chicago Medicine researchers found.
Texas Sen. John Cornyn was authorized by Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., to open talks with Democrats to “negotiate the possibility of gun legislation that will spare us the tragedies we’ve seen,” Sen. Dick Durbin said.