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Chicago architect Jeanne Gang (left) and the team of Sharon Johnston and Mark Lee, have been appointed to Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design faculty. (Photo/Handout)

Forces in Chicago architecture added to Harvard faculty

SHARE Forces in Chicago architecture added to Harvard faculty
SHARE Forces in Chicago architecture added to Harvard faculty

Three architects with connections to Chicago (and the far wider world) have been added to the faculty of Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design, with appointments as Professors in Practice of Architecture in the Department of Architecture, effective July 1, 2018.

The newly named professors are Jeanne Gang, the founding principal of the Chicago firm of Studio Gang, whose award-winning projects here include the 82-story Aqua Tower at 225 N. Columbus Drive, and Writers Theatre in Glencoe, and Sharon Johnston and Mark Lee, founders and principals of the Los Angeles-based firm of Johnston Marklee, whose most recent project in this city includes the renovation of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, which opened in September 2017. All three architects are Harvard alumni.

Gang is currently designing major projects throughout the Americas and Europe, from an expansion of the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, to the new United States Embassy in Brasilia, Brazil.

Johnston and Lee’s projects include the new UCLA Graduate Art Studios campus in Culver City, California and the Menil Drawing Institute in Houston, to be completed in 2018. They also served as co-artistic directors of the 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial.

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