Bears interview Vikings defensive coordinator George Edwards for head coach job

SHARE Bears interview Vikings defensive coordinator George Edwards for head coach job
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The Bears interviewed Vikings coordinator George Edwards on Thursday. (Getty Images)

The Bears interviewed Vikings defensive coordinator George Edwards for their head coaching vacancy Thursday in Minnesota, the team confirmed.

Pat Shurmur, the Vikings’ offensive coordinator, is expected to be interviewed next.

Edwards had to be interviewed this week because the Vikings have a playoff bye this weekend. No one has allowed fewer yards than the Vikings’ 275.9 per game or fewer points than their 15.8 per game. Their high draft picks developed into stars, something that must entice general manager Ryan Pace, who has first-round pick Leonard Floyd still searching for health and an inkling to draft another pass-rusher or cornerback in three months.

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Edwards, though, doesn’t call plays for the Vikings. That falls on coach Mike Zimmer, a former defensive coordinator.

Zimmer said last week that he’d be willing to part with those duties next year.

“He does everything other than call the gameon Sunday,” Zimmer said last week.

For the Bears, Edwards represents a peek inside a division rival. His interview came one day after they spoke with their own defensive coordinator, Vic Fangio. They’re scheduled to meet with Shurmur, followed by Patriots offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels and Eagles quarterbacks coach John DeFilippo. The team is thought to prefer an offensive mind to pair with quarterback Mitch Trubisky.

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