Rauner, Pritzker to meet jointly with Sun-Times Editorial Board

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Democrat J.B. Pritzker, left, addresses reporters in Springfield prior to Democrat Day at the Illinois State Fair. (AP File Photo/John O’Connor); Gov. Bruce Rauner, right, speaks at a bill signing at the Thompson Center. File photo.| Colin Boyle/Sun-Times

Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner and his Democratic challenger, J.B. Pritzker, will appear together before the Chicago Sun-Times Editorial Board next month.

Both have agreed to meet for an endorsement session on Oct. 9. The session, held so that editorial board members can decide which candidate the newspaper will endorse, will be livestreamed at suntimes.com.

Pritzker declined to appear alongside Rauner in the Chicago Tribune’s Editorial Board endorsement session on Friday morning. The Tribune had endorsed Rauner in the March primary.

Ahead of the March primary, Rauner faced challenger State Rep. Jeanne Ives just once during an editorial board meeting with the Tribune. He did not appear in any public debates with the Wheaton lawmaker, whom he defeated by just three points.

Pritzker and Rauner will participate in the following three debates: Sept. 20 in Chicago, sponsored by NBC 5, Telemundo, the Union League Club of Chicago and Chicago Urban League; Oct. 3 in Chicago, sponsored by ABC7, Univision and the League of Women Voters; and Oct. 11 in Quincy, sponsored by WGEM and the Illinois Broadcasters Association.

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