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President Donald Trump’s former chief strategist Steve Bannon gestures as he speaks during during an ideas festival sponsored by The Economist, Saturday, Sept. 15, 2018, in New York. Bannon said he’s surprised the #MeToo movement hasn’t had more impact on corporate America. | AP Photo

Former Trump advisor Steve Bannon compliments Time’s Up movement

SHARE Former Trump advisor Steve Bannon compliments Time’s Up movement
SHARE Former Trump advisor Steve Bannon compliments Time’s Up movement

President Donald Trump’s former chief strategist says he’s surprised the #MeToo movement hasn’t had more impact on corporate America.

Steve Bannon says he thinks Time’s Up is “the single most powerful potential political movement in the world.”

Bannon spoke Saturday in New York during an ideas festival sponsored by The Economist. His comments came the same week Les Moonves stepped down as head of CBS Corp. and the network fired “60 Minutes” executive producer Jeff Fager. Both men deny sexual misconduct allegations against them.

Asked about Time’s Up, Bannon said: “I’m quite shocked that the #MeToo movement hasn’t cut through corporate America with a bigger scythe, because I think there’s a lot of potential there.”

Time’s Up is a movement against sexual harassment that Hollywood celebrities created last year.

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