New Jersey investigating FanDuel’s refusal to pay $82,000 bet on odds glitch

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People talk to tellers while placing sports bets in New Jersey. | Julio Cortez/AP Photo

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — New Jersey gambling regulators are investigating whether FanDuel’s sports book at the Meadowlands Racetrack should pay out more than $82,000 to a man who was given exorbitant odds for the Denver Broncos to win Sunday against the Oakland Raiders.

Anthony Prince of Newark made his bet and was handed a ticket at incredible 750-1 odds with about a minute left in the game. Denver kicked a field goal with 6 seconds left to win 20-19, capping a second half comeback that started with the Broncos down 12-0.

FanDuel says its system malfunctioned and it is not obligated to pay out on an obvious error.

Prince told News12 New Jersey that FanDuel offered him $500 and some tickets to future New York Giants games, adding he should take the offer because they’re not obligated to give him anything.

David Rebuck, director of the New Jersey Division of Gaming Enforcement, wants to know how it happened.

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