Temps to plummet as cold front moves into Chicago area Friday

Temperatures will likely dip into the 40s by Friday afternoon, with wind chills in the 30s, the National Weather Service said.

SHARE Temps to plummet as cold front moves into Chicago area Friday
Chicago and some nearby suburbs saw the first snow of the season Oct. 26, 2020.

Temperatures could dip from the mid-60s to into the 40s, with near-freezing temperatures possible overnight, after a cold front moves into the Chicago on Friday, Oct. 11, 2019. Frost covers a window in this 2013 file photo.

Sun-Times file photo

Temperatures are expected to drop by at least 20 degrees after a cold front moves into the Chicago region Friday morning.

The temperature at O’Hare International Airport was 66 degrees as of 6:30 a.m. Friday, but a cold front expected to hit the city between 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. could bring that down by 10 to 15 degrees in under an hour, according to the National Weather Service.

Temperatures will likely dip into the 40s by the afternoon, with wind chills in the 30s, the weather service said. A low of 33 is forecast overnight, and sub-freezing temperatures are expected in parts of the suburbs, which could damage or kill sensitive plants if left uncovered.

Highs are expected to remain in the low 50s through Monday before climbing to about 58 on Tuesday, according to the weather service.

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