Man charged with reckless driving in Naperville crash that split BMW in half

Robert M. Skura was driving a BMW east on Ogden Avenue Oct. 4 when it hit a traffic signal at Columbia Street, causing the car to split in half and catch fire, police said.

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A Lisle man has been charged with speeding and reckless driving in an Oct. 4, 2019, crash at Ogden Avenue and Columbia Street in Naperville.

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A driver has been charged in a crash that caused his car to split in half and burst into flames earlier this month in west suburban Naperville.

Robert M. Skura, 47, is charged with one misdemeanor count each of reckless driving and speeding 35 mph over the posted speed limit for the Oct. 4 crash at Ogden Avenue and Columbia Street, according to a statement from Naperville police. He was also cited for disobeying a traffic control signal, improper lane usage and failure to reduce speed to avoid a crash.

Skura, who lives in Lisle, was driving a BMW east on Ogden about 9:50 p.m. when he struck a traffic signal at Columbia in the southeast corner of the intersection, police said.

The BMW split in half upon impact and came to a rest off the roadway, where it caught fire, police said. Skura was taken to a hospital with injuries that were serious, but not life threatening.

His next court date is scheduled for Nov. 6, according to DuPage County circuit court records.

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