Regularly eating chile peppers lowers risk of cardiovascular disease, new study reveals

The study analyzed more than 20,000 Italians and their estimated intake of chile peppers.

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Regularly eating chile peppers is linked to a lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease, but experts suggest the findings don’t necessarily mean you should drastically spice up your diet.

Regularly eating chile peppers is linked to a lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease, but experts suggest the findings don’t necessarily mean you should drastically spice up your diet.

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Regularly eatingchilepeppers is linked to a lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease, according to a new studyof Italian adults. But experts suggestthe findings don’tnecessarilymean you should drastically spice up your diet.

The research,publishedin the December issue of the peer-reviewedJournal of the American College of Cardiology, was prompted by a lack of research on the traditional Mediterranean diet’s regular inclusion ofchile peppers.

The study analyzed more than 20,000 Italians and their estimated intake of chilepeppers; it found a link between regularly eating peppers anda lower risk of death, including deaths caused by heart disease.

It’s not the first time a study has linked chile pepper consumption with longer life.University of Vermont researchersfound people who reported eating hot red chile peppers had a 13% reduced risk of death,according to a reportin 2017.

Still, several expertspointed out limitations of the new study and offered explanations for the results.

A registered dietitian told CNNthe health benefits may come from chiles often being included in diets rich in fresh foods.

The health benefits are probably small, and the chile’s true health benefit may be as a tasty ingredient that”makes eating other healthy foods more pleasurable,” Duane Mellor, ateaching fellow at Aston Medical School in Birmingham, U.K., told the network.

The study’s lead author, Marialaura Bonaccio, told CNN the research had found chilepeppers’health benefits were observed independently of diet — whether a person ate a healthy diet or less healthy diet, eating chile peppers appeared to help extend their life.

Should you start spicing up your diet for the health benefits? That’s not entirely clear.

Forbes notedat least one study on miceraised questions about spicy foods’ connection with an increased risk ofcancer. The publication pointedoutobservational studies such as thisone cannot provecause-and-effect, indicating that more research may be needed.

Read more at usatoday.com

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