Julia Louis-Dreyfus loved Northwestern hoopster son Charlie Hall’s ‘Veep’ cameo

SHARE Julia Louis-Dreyfus loved Northwestern hoopster son Charlie Hall’s ‘Veep’ cameo
screen_shot_2019_04_17_at_11.47.56_am_e1555519762461.png

Julia Louis-Dreyfus and her son Charlie Hall on “Late Night With Seth Meyers.” | Screenshot

Julia Louis-Dreyfus couldn’t contain her delight at seeing her son, Northwestern basketball player Charlie Hall, make a cameo on her popular HBO comedy “Veep.”

The award-winning actress visited “Late Night With Seth Meyers” on Tuesday night to hype the new season, and ended up spending a good chunk of the appearance effusing over her son and his foray into acting. Hall also made a brief appearance on the late-night show, which can be seen near the end of the clip posted below.

“It was actually (showrunner) Dave Mandel’s idea, God bless him.” Louis-Dreyfus said of Hall’s cameo. “There was this role of an inappropriately young boyfriend to a record executive who’s in his 50s, and Dave said, ‘Hey, maybe Charlie can play that part.’ And I said, ‘Sure, I’ll ask him.’ And I was terrified ‘cause I thought he might screw it up. Sorry, honey.”

Hall, who’s set to graduate from Northwestern this summer, made his appearance during the second episode of the seventh season, which aired on April 7.

The 21-year-old also briefly shows up on “Late Night” with his mother, wearing a pineapple shirt that Meyers points out he likely wouldn’t have been cool enough to wear when he was a Northwestern student. Louis-Dreyfus, like Hall and Meyers, also attended the school in Evanston.

The Latest
Co-worker claimed he’d broken up with his ex and she was out of the picture, but now he’s getting back together with her.
The Bears put the finishing touches on their invigorating offseason Tuesday.
Buzelis has opened some eyes through the first three games of Summer League play for the Bulls, displaying a versatility in both scoring and playing defense. But what really stands out is his confidence bordering on cockiness, as well as his desire to win.
The Japanese rookie’s first All-Star experience was a good one. “I kind of felt like I was floating,” he said.