clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Bulls point guard Kris Dunn wants some answers from the front office Thursday

Point guard Kris Dunn wants to know what the Bulls’ front office is thinking. By all indications, the feeling is mutual.

That’s why it’s unlikely any exit interview will be more interesting than when Dunn sits down with coach Jim Boylen and vice president of basketball operations John Paxson and some hard truths are discussed Thursday.

Dunn met with the media for likely the last time this season Tuesday and discussed everything from how his season went to the idea of the organization adding a veteran point guard this summer to compete for his starting job.

His response to the latter?

‘‘I’m a dog,’’ Dunn said. ‘‘I don’t run from nothing.’’

That hasn’t been up for debate. What has, however, is whether Dunn has the skills to be a starter as the rebuild moves into its third season and whether the Bulls truly are committed to him.

‘‘I haven’t really talked to them,’’ Dunn said. ‘‘So once I talk to them, I’ll get a sense of what they’re thinking.

‘‘It’s a business. They’re going to do what they’re going to do. I’m just going to control what I can control. I’m excited to get back in the gym and do what I do.’’

Dunn’s best argument will be his performance in December 2017 and January 2018. The Bulls played their best basketball of last season during that time, and Dunn averaged 14.8 points and just less than eight assists in the stretch.

RELATED

If Bulls’ rebuild is going to succeed, winning more home games would help

Don’t expect the Bulls to go all-in on one big-ticket player in free agency

The injury to his face he suffered on a dunk against the Warriors basically derailed his season, but he had shown the Bulls he could be a lead guard.

Then this season happened. Dunn played in only 46 games because of knee, ankle and back injuries. Of more concern was that when the Bulls were at full strength, which wasn’t very often, he looked lost in the offense. It got so bad that Boylen even moved him off the ball late in games, allowing shooting guard Zach LaVine to play facilitator.

And while Dunn wasn’t about to rock the boat publicly, he does want to make sure the front office understands his feelings about his role.

‘‘Earlier this season I was being aggressive, and it kind of deferred away from Lauri [Markkanen] a little bit,’’ Dunn said. ‘‘So the next stretch, I kind of sacrificed my role to see how it went. You could say it was for the better, you could say it was for the worse. I really don’t know the answer to that. Going forward, it allowed me to understand who I am as a player, and that’s to be aggressive.

‘‘[Having the ball in my hands], that’s just how I’ve played since I was yea-high. I always had that ball in my hands. If I knew we were going to do multi-ballhandlers, I would’ve prepped for it [last] summer. But going into the summer, my job was to create for others.’’

One question Dunn had trouble answering was why the Bulls’ offense looked so clunky even when the team was at — or close to — full strength.

‘‘In the sense of the core, we all didn’t have a chance to really play all together,’’ Dunn said. ‘‘When we did, there was no rhythm to it, no flow.’’

That’s a problem all sides involved hope will be cleared up beginning Thursday.