Frankfort man arrested for stealing cellphone from Orland Park store

Lance R. Payne, 25, was charged with one felony count of aggravated robbery, according to a statement from Orland Park police.

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A Barlett based travel agent was charged with allegedly stealing money from clients.

Lance R. Payne of Frankfort was charged with one felony count of aggravated robbery.

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A 25-year-old man was arrested Monday after allegedly stealing a cellphone from a southwest suburban Orland Park business.

Lance R. Payne of Frankfort was charged with one felony count of aggravated robbery, according to a statement from Orland Park police.

About 10 a.m., Payne allegedly entered a Disc Replay at 15015 La Grange Rd. and asked an employee to show him a cellphone locked in a case, police said. After the employee took it out, Payne allegedly grabbed it and ran out of the store. The employee told police that Payne pulled what looked like a black handgun out of his waistband and pointed it at the employee.

About an hour later, employees at a nearby Matteson business notified Disc Replay that a man matching Payne’s description was inside the store and trying to sell the cellphone, police said. They called Matteson police, who took the offender into custody. Officers recovered a pellet gun and seized Payne’s vehicle.

The Disc Replay employee picked Payne out of a lineup at the Matteson police station and he was then charged, police said.

Lance R. Payne mugshot

Lance R. Payne

Orland Park Police Department

Payne was given a $10,000 recognizance bond, police said. His next court date is June 24.

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