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More rain possible overnight after thunderstorms shut down Pride Parade

There is a possibility that storms may make their way into the metro Chicagoland area, but severe weather chances are lower, the weather service said.

Chicago skyline as seen from Soldier Field.
Sunday night storms may pose a risk of wind damage with gusts of up to 65 miles per hour and frequent lightning, the weather service said.
Sun-Times photo

A storm system moving southeast from Wisconsin may bring strong winds and heavy rains near the city Sunday night after thunderstorms hit Chicago and ended the Chicago Pride Parade early.

Additional complex thunderstorms are expected in areas east of Chicago until about 9 p.m., the weather service said. Storms may be severe and pose a risk of wind damage with gusts of up to 65 miles per hour and frequent lightning.

There is a possibility that these storms may make their way into the metro Chicagoland area, but severe weather chances are lower, the weather service said.

The 50th Annual Chicago Pride Parade was a casualty of the thunderstorms that moved across the area Sunday afternoon.

About 2:35 p.m., the Police Department said they were stopping the parade because of “inclement weather.” Just after 3 p.m., the department announced the parade’s cancellation.

Several parade floats were held in anticipation of the storms before they could take off on their route, the OEMC said.

The parade, which kicked off at noon from Montrose Avenue and Broadway, had previously been planned to go on “rain or shine,” according to the parade’s official website.

A severe thunderstorm warning was in effect until 3:30 p.m. for Chicago and the surrounding area, including Cook, Will, Kankakee and DuPage counties, the weather service said. The area was under a severe thunderstorm watch until 6 p.m., as were more than 30 neighboring counties in Illinois and northern Wisconsin.