Chicago Catholic Charities’ CEO steps down after 30 years with the agency

Monsignor Michael Boland will leave his position Aug. 16, the Archdiocese of Chicago announced.

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Monsignor Michael Boland talking with a volunteer at a Thanksgiving meal in 2015, will step down from his position at Chicago Catholic Charities’ CEO on Aug. 16.

Monsignor Michael Boland talking with a volunteer at a Thanksgiving meal in 2015, will step down from his position at Chicago Catholic Charities’ CEO on Aug. 16.

Kevin Tanaka / Sun-Times

Monsignor Michael M. Boland, chief executive officer of Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Chicago, is stepping down after 30 years.

The archdiocese announced Tuesday that Boland will leave his position on Aug. 16.

“Leading Catholic Charities in the service of the poor and vulnerable has been an honor and privilege,” Boland said in a written statement. “While my heart will always be with Catholic Charities, it is time for me to step back, rest and transition to a new phase of my priestly ministry.”

Boland will be a consultant to the social services agency and will help in the search for his replacement until he begins his sabbatical in November, according to the archdiocese.

Cardinal Blase Cupich has asked Kathleen Donahue, a 40-year veteran with Catholic Charities, to be acting director during a search for a permanent successor.

“The generosity of spirit that has motivated him over the years once again leads him to help ensure our brothers and sisters will continue to receive the basics of life, a second chance, and, most of all, hope,” Cupich said in written statement.

Catholic Charities Chicago reports an annual budget of more than $200 million. It delivers services at more than 174 locations in Cook and Lake counties with a staff of 3,000 and the help of more than 15,000 volunteers.

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