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The next president will be Donald Trump or Mitch McConnell

Anyone who thinks that if Joe Biden wins, McConnell will suddenly turn bipartisan and work to move things forward for the good of the country, did not pay attention during the Obama administration.

Senators Meet With Supreme Court Nominee Amy Coney Barrett
Amy Coney Barrett, President Donald Trump’s nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court, attends a meeting with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) at the U.S. Capitol in preparation for her confirmation hearing, on September 29, 2020 in Washington, DC.
Photo by Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty Images

As I write this on Wednesday morning the results of presidential election is still ‘up in the air.’

It is clear that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has won Kentucky, and it also appears that the GOP will retain the senate. What that really means, and what is being avoided by the media, is that in reality our next president will be either Trump or McConnell.

Anyone who thinks that if Joe Biden wins McConnell will suddenly turn bipartisan and work to move things forward for the good of the country did not pay attention during the Obama administration. Add to the fact that the Supreme Court is stacked 6-3 with conservatives, the judicial branch is further to one side as it has ever been in our history.

John Farrell, DeKalb

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An existential question for the people of this country

The Sun-Times editorial “Character counts, first and last, in American politics from here on out” talks about how naive we feel in thinking/hoping that Donald Trump would be totally repudiated by the American electorate. Instead, we have a nail-biter of an election — proving that the American people will vote for a presidential candidate who has proved himself to be corrupt, incompetent and venal, with no character in any sense of the word, and who threatens the very tenets of our democracy.

As an American, I have always felt that despite our policy differences, we all wanted candidates who are honesty and have character and an ethical core. This election feels like we’re living in the “Twilight Zone,” where the greater the con, the more votes are received. It’s as if the values of our democracy have been turned on their head. “What do we do to come back from that?” is the existential question.

Carol Kraines, Deerfield

Question toward elections in 2020

Like so many other things that occurred on Election Day, this may be too early to call. But should Americans be pleased that so many citizens voted? Or should we be disgruntled that in an age of technology, we can’t determine a winner on the same day?

Bob Ory, Elgin