Longtime WGN sports editor Jack Rosenberg dies at age 94

Rosenberg, who was a force behind WGN’s sports programming, is credited with helping to develop the modern sports broadcast.

SHARE Longtime WGN sports editor Jack Rosenberg dies at age 94
Former WGN sports editor Jack Rosenberg, shown in a 1958 photo at Comiskey Park, has died at age 94.

Former WGN sports editor Jack Rosenberg, shown in a 1958 photo at Comiskey Park, has died at age 94.

Longtime WGN-TV and WGN Radio sports editor Jack Rosenberg died Sunday at Swedish Hospital in Chicago. He was 94.

Rosenberg, a force behind WGN’s sports programming, is credited with helping to develop the modern sports broadcast. He started working at WGN in 1954.

‘‘Jack was sports editor at WGN for 40 years, a career encompassing all Chicago sports teams and thousands of broadcasts,’’ WGN director of production Bob Vorwald tweeted. ‘‘The sound of his typewriter softly clicking behind Jack Brickhouse was the soundtrack of summer for generations of Cubs fans.’’

Rosenberg was typing up information on notecards to pass to Cubs broadcasters such as Brickhouse, Harry Caray and Vince Lloyd. Viewers rarely saw him, but they were well aware of his presence and effect on the broadcast.

At Brickhouse’s behest, ‘‘Rosey’’ came to WGN after working at the Peoria Journal Star. He played a part in launching the careers of WGN-TV’s Rich King, Dan Roan and Vorwald and WGN Radio’s Lou Boudreau, Bob Brenly and Ron Santo.

Rosenberg also wrote Brickhouse’s autobiography, ‘‘Thanks for Listening,’’ as well as Brickhouse’s induction speech for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1983. He fought in the Navy during World War II.

Rosenberg, who grew up in Pekin, Illinois, was inducted into the WGN Radio Walk of Fame in 2017 and the Silver Circle of the Chicago/Midwest chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences in 2011.

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