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Mary Trump says uncle Donald may have ‘undiagnosed learning disability’ in new book

The president cheated to get into the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School, she alleges, with someone taking his SATs for him.

“Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man,” written by Mary Trump, the niece of President Donald J. Trump, was originally set for release on July 28, but will now arrive on July 14.
“Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man,” written by Mary Trump, the niece of President Donald J. Trump, was originally set for release on July 28, but will now arrive on July 14.
AP

President Donald Trump, who often brags about his degree from the University of Pennsylvania and being a “stable genius,” cheated to get into its prestigious Wharton School, his niece, Mary Trump writes in her new memoir, detailing three generations of a dysfunctional family.

“Donald Trump may have a long undiagnosed learning disability that for decades has interfered with his ability to process information,” Mary Trump said in her new book “Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man.”

Donald Trump has tried to block publication of the book, which had its publication date moved up from July 28 to July 14 by publisher Simon & Schuster.

In a copy of the book, obtained by the Chicago Sun-Times, Mary Trump said when Donald Trump wanted to transfer from Fordham University in the Bronx to Wharton, he worried his grade point average was too low to get in, so he asked “Joe Shapiro, a smart kid with a reputation for being a good test-taker, to take his SATs for him.”

Mary Trump writes that her grandfather Fred — the president’s father — “short-circuited Donald’s ability to develop and experience the entire spectrum of human emotion.”

Mary Trump, who has a PhD in clinical psychology, said she was not writing the book to cash in or for “revenge,” alluding to her lawsuit against the family after being, she said, short-changed when it came to her share of an inheritance from her grandfather.

Rather, events of past three years “forced my hand,” she said. Mary Trump’s father, Freddy, the oldest son, died at age 42. By age 12, “encouraged by his father, Donald eventually started to believe his own hype.”

Other revelations:

• When the family visited Donald Trump at the White House he said the place “never looked better since George Washington lived here,” though Washington never lived in the White House.

• Donald Trump’s sister Maryanne, now a retired federal judge who did his homework for him when he was at Fordham, said when he ran, “He’s a clown.”

• The president was molded by a harsh family environment. “Casual dehumanization of people was commonplace at the Trump dinner table,” Mary Trump writes.

• The “media failed to notice that not one member of Donald’s family, apart from his children, his son-in-law and his current wife said a word of support of him during the entire campaign.”

• After her grandfather Fred died in 1999 Mary Trump learned her father’s family line was erased in the will as if “Fred Trump’s oldest son had never existed, and a lawsuit followed.”

• “To this day, the lies, misrepresentations, and fabrications that are the sum total of who my uncle is are perpetuated by the Republican Party and white evangelical Christians,” Mary Trump writes.

• New York elites regarded Donald Trump as a “court jester from Queens” but invited him to parties, validating his “grandiose” self image.

• Mary Trump said the president’s grievances goes back to his youth. She writes, “Nothing was ever fair to him.”

  • She also writes about how she was a key source for the New York Times’ Pulitzer Prize-winning story about Trump’s finances, at first rebuffing outreach from a reporter. After Mary Trump “watched in real time as Donald shredded norms, endangered alliances, and trod upon the vulnerable” and “as I watched our democracy disintegrating and people’s lives unraveling because of my uncle’s policies,” she decided to help, eventually turning over 19 boxes of documents to the Times reporting team.