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Man with Adam Toledo when police killed 13-year-old posts bond, released from custody

Ruben Roman has been charged with reckless discharge of a firearm, unlawful use of a weapon, child endangerment and violating probation.

A memorial sits at the mouth of the alleyway where Adam Toledo was shot and killed by Chicago police near 24th Street and Sawyer Avenue in the Little Village neighborhood. Tyler LaRiviere/Sun-Times

The man who allegedly fired a gun before a Chicago police officer shot and killed the 13-year-old Adam Toledo posted bond and was released from Cook County jail over the weekend.

Ruben Roman, 21, was placed on electronic monitoring after he posted $15,000 bond Saturday for charges tied to Toledo’s shooting along with a $25,000 bond for a separate weapons case, the Cook County Sheriff’s Department said Monday.

Surveillance video captured Roman shooting at a passing vehicle on the morning of March 29, while Adam stood next to him at 24th Street and Sawyer Avenue, according to prosecutors.

After firing the shots, Roman ran north with Adam on Sawyer Avenue and ducked into an alley near 23rd Street, where officers spotted them about a minute later, prosecutors said.

One officer tackled Roman and knocked loose a pair of red gloves that were later found to have gunshot residue on them, prosecutors said. Police body-camera footage showed the other officer continuing to chase Adam down the alley.

Adam, at one point, is seen standing sideways in a large gap of a wooden fence with what appears to be a gun in one of his hands. The officer is on the other side of the alley and yells, “Drop it!”

In less than a second, Adam drops the gun and raises his empty hands as the officer fires, striking the boy in the chest.

After the shooting, Roman was initially charged with resisting arrest — a misdemeanor. An arrest warrant was later issued after Roman skipped a court date.

Roman was then charged with reckless discharge of a firearm, unlawful use of a weapon, child endangerment and violating probation.

When detectives questioned Roman about Adam’s identity, Roman allegedly gave them a fake name. He denied knowing Adam or firing any shots and claimed he was in the alley “waiting for a train,” prosecutors said.