clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Illinois-record lake trout: Dr. Atul Mallik makes history on a family outing on the Massive Confusion

Dr. Atul Mallik turned a family outing on the Massive Confusion Monday into a moment of history by catching the next Illinois-record lake trout; plus notes and the Stray Cast.

Dr. Atul Mallik caught the next Illinois-record lake trout Monday on the Massive Confusion. Provided photo
Dr. Atul Mallik caught the next Illinois-record lake trout Monday on the Massive Confusion.
Provided

No one is sure how old Rabindra Mallik is because of lost records and a fire around the time of his birth in a village in India. But he was probably born around 1949.

That struck me while talking with Dr. Atul Mallik, Rabindra’s oldest son, who caught the soon-to-be Illinois-record lake trout Monday. Lake trout can live for decades, and it will be interesting to hear speculations by biologists about the age of Mallik’s laker, a stocked fish indicated by the clipped fin. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service lists the oldest laker at 70 years old.

‘‘This is a fishing family,’’ Mallik’s wife, Kirsten, said as she was driving the family home. ‘‘There were three generations on the boat.’’

Mallik, a radiologist at Loyola, set up ‘‘a last-minute charter’’ for himself and his family — his father, younger brothers Ronat and Amit, wife, daughter Nikita and son Indra — on the Massive Confusion out of Montrose Harbor.

‘‘[Rabindra] took us all fishing as kids,’’ Mallik said.

Three generations of the Mallik family (L-R Indra, Kirsten, Nikita, Ronak, Rabindra, Atul, Amit) after a history-making charter on the Massive Confusion. Provided photo
Three generations of the Mallik family (L-R Indra, Kirsten, Nikita, Ronak, Rabindra, Atul, Amit) after a history-making charter on the Massive Confusion.
Provided

On the charter, fishing etiquette and tradition may have come into play. On charters, a custom of generally taking turns on the rods is followed.

‘‘I let everybody else go first,’’ Mallik said.

His final spot proved fortunate. When he picked up the seventh rod, history was in the making.

‘‘We realized how big it was when [first mate] Gregg [Peters] was bringing it in and was excitedly jumping up and down,’’ Mallik said.

Peters has netted and handled a lot of big fish, but not an Illinois-record one until then.

Mallik compared the experience to watching a video of people deep-sea fishing.

He had caught some nice bluefish off the Jersey Shore, but he said, ‘‘This is certainly the largest freshwater fish I have ever caught.’’

The Massive Confusion was in 110 feet of water. Mallik’s laker came on an O chrome Dodger and a green-and-white Spin-n-Glo with a prismatic Howie fly.

Peters and Mallik brought — lugged, more accurately — the laker to be weighed on the certified scale at Park Bait, where it came to 39.16 pounds. It was 45œ inches long with a girth of 28 inches.

‘‘It’s a beast,’’ Park Bait proprietor Stacey Greene said.

A beast big enough to top the standing Illinois record for lake trout (38 pounds, 4 ounces) by nearly a pound. Ted Rullman caught that record on Aug. 22, 1999, from the Lake County waters of Lake Michigan.

‘‘It was magical,’’ Mallik said. ‘‘Everything was perfect. The weather was great, and everybody got up in time.’’

They had to be on the dock by 4:45 a.m., which, Mallik noted, ‘‘For my family, that is an early start.’’

Mallik filled out the paperwork at Park Bait. The fish was dropped off at Tom Wendel Wildlife Artist in Arlington Heights for the taxidermy work. A biologist from the Illinois Department of Natural Resources will check the fish there. Then, once the paperwork is signed off, the record officially will be Mallik’s.

Dr. Atul Mallik enjoys a moment of unbridled joy after catching the soon-to-be Illinois-record lake trout. Provided photo
Dr. Atul Mallik enjoys a moment of unbridled joy after catching the soon-to-be Illinois-record lake trout.
Provided photo

Mullady

The Kankakee Valley Park District’s dedication for naming the Bird Park boat launch in Kankakee in honor of Ed Mullady is at 5 p.m. Tuesday, June 8. Mullady, the Hall of Fame advocate for the Kankakee River, died at 94 in December.

Big buck

Don Higgins’ buck ‘‘Mel’’ was net-scored at 197 3/8 inches May 19 by scorers Tim Walmsley and Jim Barry. That makes it the second-highest-scoring typical buck taken by bow in Illinois, behind Mel Johnson’s world-record typical (204 4/8). Higgins’ buck was named for Johnson.

Wild things

I beat the birds to my first-of-the-year semi-wild strawberries Sunday.

Stray cast

Baseball in Chicago is beginning to resemble a summer trip to the Boundary Waters, complete with grueling portages and glorious rewards.