Super Mario 64 game cartridge from 1996, unopened, sells for $1.56M

It was the best-selling game on the Nintendo 64 platform and the first to feature the Mario character in 3D.

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An unopened copy of Nintendo’s Super Mario 64 that has been sold at auction for $1.56 million.

An unopened copy of Nintendo’s Super Mario 64 that has been sold at auction for $1.56 million.

Heritage Auctions

An unopened copy of Nintendo’s Super Mario 64 from 1996 has been sold at auction for $1.56 million.

Heritage Auctions in Dallas said the price broke its previous record for the sale of a single video game but did not say who bought the game.

Super Mario 64 was the best-selling game on the Nintendo 64 platform and the first to feature the Mario character in 3D.

The sale follows an unopened copy of Nintendo’s The Legend of Zelda selling at auction for $870,000.

Valarie McLeckie, Heritage’s video game specialist, said the auction house was shocked to see a game sell for more than a $1 million two days after the Zelda game had just broken its past record.

In April, the auction house sold an unopened copy of Nintendo’s Super Mario Bros. that was bought in 1986 and forgotten about in a desk drawer for $660,000.

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