After COVID-19 cancellations, Chicago cop crowned queen of downtown St. Patrick’s Day Parade

With Gov. J.B. Pritzker and Mayor Lori Lightfoot looking on, Kelly Leyden was named the “Queen of the Court” during a ceremony Thursday evening at the Plumbers Hall in West Town.

SHARE After COVID-19 cancellations, Chicago cop crowned queen of downtown St. Patrick’s Day Parade
Kelly Leyden was named the queen during a ceremony Thursday evening at the Plumbers Hall in West Town. 

Kelly Leyden was named the queen during a ceremony Thursday evening at the Plumbers Hall in West Town.

Tyler LaRiviere/Sun-Times

After a two-year hiatus, a new “Queen of the Court” for the downtown St. Patrick’s Day Parade has finally been crowned.

With Gov. J.B. Pritzker and Mayor Lori Lightfoot looking on, Chicago cop Kelly Leyden was named the queen during a ceremony Thursday evening at the Plumbers Hall in West Town.

Leyden will now take center stage March 12, when revelers flock to the Loop to celebrate the Feast of St. Patrick and the dyeing of the Chicago River following consecutive COVID-19-related cancellations.

“We all know and look forward to this occasion, not only the dyeing of the river but the parade [and] gathering together,” Pritzker said. “And we’re going to be able to do that this year, and I’m excited about the opportunity for us all to be together outdoors once again.”

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