Little Village arch’s landmark designation gives Adrian Lozano recognition he deserves

With his passing in 2004, Lozano left behind a shared legacy with those of his generation of early Mexican Chicagoans who forever changed the landscape of this city.

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The Little Village arch on West 26th Street near South Albany Avenue in Little Village on the Southwest Side.

The Little Village arch on West 26th Street near South Albany Avenue in Little Village on the Southwest Side.

Ashlee Rezin Garcia/Sun-Times

Thanks to the work of the Chicago Landmarks Commission and the City Council Zoning Committee, Mexican-born and lifetime Chicago resident Adrian Lozano is finally getting long overdue recognition for his work.

The Little Village arch, which won landmark designation status from the City Council last month, is only one of many projects from school buildings to social service agency structures that architect Lozano left his distinct style on in Chicago’s Latino community.

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With his passing in 2004, he left behind a shared legacy with those of his generation of early Mexican Chicagoans who forever changed the landscape of this city and who have given inspiration to a new generation of Chicago Latinos.

Cristina Vital, Hickory Hills

Merrick Garland must act on Jan. 6

For anyone taking an honest look at Donald Trump’s disdain for the law, which also involves the leading figures connected to him, the first thing to look at are the historic federal violations.

A lot has already been revealed about the coup attempt by Trump forces aiming to overthrow an elected government. Equally obvious was Trump’s incitement of the violent Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol.

For the first time in U.S. history, we’ve seen a defeated former president and his accomplices plot to undermine the democratic nature of this country. The congressional committee digging into and exposing the causes behind the Jan. 6 insurrection can’t put anybody in jail. That’s the job of U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland and the Justice Department.

So far, the only Garland prosecution related to these critical matters was the indictment of Steve Bannon; the meticulous former judge may still be seeking certainty about all the evidence. Unless Garland acts soon, the damage could blow over.

Ed Stone, Northbrook

Get over it — wear a mask

John Getzinger’s recent letter to the editor sums up our nation’s reaction to COVID-19. Vast swaths of the country channel their inner 4-year-old and whine that general rules are not tailored to their specific situation.

Suck it up, butter cup. You are wearing a mask because we are all wearing masks. We can’t make exceptions for everyone who feels they are a special case, because then everyone will figure out a way to justify themselves as a special case.

At that point, mitigation efforts will be useless, our emergency rooms will fill up and stay filled up, and all sorts of other medical emergencies will go untreated.

So instead of focusing on how the science affects you, focus on how it affects society.

Don Anderson, Oak Park

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