One of the winning images from a previous Chicago Sun-Times student art contest.

One of the winning images from a previous Chicago Sun-Times student art contest.

Provided

Enter the Sun-Times’ student art contest The Imagination Project with your take on ‘Spring ahead’

Students from pre-K through high school in Chicago and the suburbs are eligible. Here’s how to enter.

SHARE Enter the Sun-Times’ student art contest The Imagination Project with your take on ‘Spring ahead’
SHARE Enter the Sun-Times’ student art contest The Imagination Project with your take on ‘Spring ahead’

We’re inviting kids from pre-K through high school in Chicago and the suburbs to tap their best artistic impulses to create and send us a work of art to fit the theme “Spring ahead.”

It’s for the newest Chicago Sun-Times art contest, part of what we call The Imagination Project.

Submit a drawing or painting or digital artwork that shows your vision of moving forward into better days than the tough ones we’ve faced during the pandemic — or whatever else fits your vision of springing ahead.

Once you’ve finished your creation, submit a photo of it by the April 24 deadline with your name, age, grade, school and hometown or neighborhood by clicking here, where you’ll also find the complete contest rules.

We’ll choose a series of winners — probably five from elementary school, five from middle school and five from high school — and announce them later this spring.

Besides getting a modest prize, the winners’ work will be published by the Chicago Sun-Times in print and online.

Submissions must be the students’ own artwork. And parents’ permission is needed to take part.

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