80-degree temperatures expected Saturday in Chicago after stormy Friday

The last 80-degree day in Chicago was over six months ago, on Oct. 9.

SHARE 80-degree temperatures expected Saturday in Chicago after stormy Friday
A man walks with two small children, each with an umbrella, on West Glenlake Avenue near North Broadway Avenue, in the Edgewater neighborhood, as Chicago is soaked by thunderstorms, Friday, April 22, 2022.

A man walks with two small children, each with an umbrella, on West Glenlake Avenue near North Broadway Avenue, in the Edgewater neighborhood, as Chicago is soaked by thunderstorms, Friday, April 22, 2022.

Tyler Pasciak LaRiviere/Sun-Times

After the rain comes sunshine.

That’s expected to be true for Chicago this weekend, as storms on Friday give way to summer-like temperatures in the 80s Saturday.

Isolated storms will continue to move through northern Illinois Friday afternoon, with lightning and small hail possible in some areas, according to the National Weather Service.

Some areas may see fog as temperatures rise overnight.

Saturday should be mostly sunny with a high near 84 degrees at O’Hare Airport, the weather service said. Wind gusts could reach 40 mph in the afternoon.

The last 80-degree day in Chicago was over six months ago, on Oct. 9, according to the weather service.

But residents shouldn’t put away their coats just yet.

More storms are possible Sunday. Temperatures should rise to the low 70s during the day and lower to the 40s at night, the weather service said.

Monday should stay dry, but it will be colder with highs in the 50s before dipping into the 30s at night.

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