Hundreds join May Day rally at Union Park: ‘If we work in this country, we should have justice’

Union members, socialists, communists and activists came together in a show of solidarity, pushing for higher wages, immigrant and abortion rights and racial harmony.

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Supporters from various groups gather at a rally and march for May Day at Union Park, Sunday, May 1, 2022.

Supporters from various groups gather at a rally and march for May Day at Union Park, Sunday, May 1, 2022.

Anthony Vazquez/Sun-Times

A diverse coalition of advocates and organizations gathered Sunday in Union Park for May Day, presenting a unified front on the international workers’ holiday that was created to commemorate the Haymarket riot that happened just a mile away.

Union members, socialists, communists and activists all came together in a show of solidarity, pushing for higher wages for tipped workers, immigrant and abortion rights and racial harmony, among other things.

“All of us are being deprived of that principle of justice,” Abel Muhammad, a student minister with the Nation of Islam, told the crowd. “If we work in this country, we should have justice. If we have children and family in this country, we should have justice. And we shouldn’t have to beg for it.”

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A supporter holds a sign as various groups march down Randolph Street for May Day in West Town, Sunday, May 1, 2022.

Anthony Vazquez/Sun-Times

Andy Thayer, of Chicago for Abortion Rights and the Gay Liberation Network, compared the hurdles faced by those currently advocating for social, racial and economic justice to the fight Chicago workers undertook in 1886.

On May 3 that year, Chicago police killed one worker and injured seven others who were striking for an eight-hour workday. A rally the following day at Haymarket Square decrying the brutality also turned violent when police tried to disperse the crowd and a bomb was set off, leading to chaotic response, dozens of injuries and the deaths of seven cops and at least four bystanders.

“Back in 1886, it was a strike not just for the eight-hour day,” Thayer said. “It was for dignity for immigrant labor to deal with the oppressive conditions they faced, not just the exploitation. And we move forward to 2022, and we’re facing many of the same issues.”

Thayer insisted that reproductive and LGBTQ rights are now under serious threat as some politicians focus on “waging war” abroad and attempt to “throw immigrants under the bus.”

Saul Arellano, the son of immigration activist Elvira Arellano, noted that immigrants became “the frontline workers that kept this economy going” during the pandemic.

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Saul Arellano speaks to a crowd about legalization during a rally at Union Park for May Day, Sunday, May 1, 2022.

Anthony Vazquez/Sun-Times

“A lot of them lost their lives. A lot of them did everything for this country,” he said. “And it is today the reason why we stand alongside them, and we stand ready to fight for their rights.”

Arellano’s mother gained national fame when she took refuge in a Humboldt Park church in 2006 after being convicted of using a false Social Security number to gain employment as an airplane cleaner at O’Hare Airport. Although she was eventually deported, she’s now back in Chicago fighting for asylum.

“Today, we stand here united as a family letting you know that if you fight, if you keep doing this, we will receive justice,” he said. “But unfortunately, we need to understand that myself and the rest of our communities are still under attack and that we still need to keep fighting for them and we still need to keep fighting for each other.”

The crowd of a few hundred then hoisted signs and flags and banged drums as they marched eastbound following the rally, with plans to pass the Haymarket Memorial and proceed to Daley Plaza.

“The people united will never be defeated,” many chanted while walking on Randolph Street in the West Loop.

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Supporters from various groups march down Randolph Street for May Day in West Town, Sunday, May 1, 2022.

Anthony Vazquez/Sun-Times

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