Ricketts family should sell the Cubs

The Ricketts are more concerned with their network, hotel and other developments while hitting the fans with some of the highest ticket prices in major league baseball.

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Seiya Suzuki of the Chicago Cubs celebrates with teammates in the dugout after scoring during the fifth inning of a game against the Pittsburgh Pirates at Wrigley Field on April 23.

Seiya Suzuki of the Chicago Cubs celebrates with teammates in the dugout after scoring during the fifth inning of a game against the Pittsburgh Pirates at Wrigley Field on April 23.

Nuccio DiNuzzo/Getty Images

I am 75 years old and have been a loyal Chicago Cubs fan for close to 70 of those years. I grew up and suffered through the years of the Wrigley family. I saw the collage of coaches, the collapse of ‘69 and the dashed hopes of ‘84, ‘89, ‘98 and into the new century.

When the current ownership came to control the franchise, my first reaction was that this was a family whose sole agenda was to make money. In 2016, the Cubs caught lightning in a bottle and won it all. Shortly after the euphoria wore off, things changed.

It began with Theo Epstein leaving, maybe because he saw where the franchise was headed. Shortly after that, the team began what only can be referred to as a “salary dump.”

First it was Darvish, getting little in return. Then, in the off-season, the only move was to sign a utility infielder who previously played for the Cardinals. And then they let Schwarber walk away and then of course the trading of Rizzo, Baez and Bryant, all due to be free agents at season’s end.

Add to this the Cubs approach to pitching, similar to the practice of the Oakland Raiders some years ago. They would sign virtually any and every player available, hoping to find players with still something left.

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To be clear, I mean no disrespect to the players. I respect them for doing what they can under the circumstances. I especially feel bad for David Ross. But anyone who follows baseball agrees that a mix of veterans and young players usually lead to a winning formula. The Cubs simply don’t have that.

The Ricketts are more concerned with their network, hotel and other developments while hitting the fans with some of the highest ticket prices in major league baseball. Needless to say, I’m beyond disappointed. As long as the current ownership is in place, I will not set foot in the “friendly confines.”

If the Ricketts family truly has any interest in doing what is best for Chicago and especially Cubs fans, do one thing — sell the team to somebody who cares.

Dan Pupo, Orland Park

Add more seats to the Supreme Court

Nowhere in the Constitution does it say we have to have nine Supreme Court Justices. Nor would it require a constitutional amendment to add more seats. In fact, Congress has expanded the Supreme Court five times throughout American history.

Congress should use its constitutional authority to rebalance the Supreme Court, which has been taken over by a supermajority that holds extreme views. Congress must pass the Judiciary Act, which would add four seats to the Supreme Court and help stem the right-wing supermajority’s attacks on our fundamental freedoms, including the right to access abortion care.

There’s nothing stopping Congress from adding justices, except for the political will to do it, of course. I’m urging Congress to pass the Judiciary Act of 2021.

Joann Butkus, Southwest Side

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