Local election officials are committed to protecting voters rights

Elections are administered by state and local officials who implement numerous safeguards to protect the security of your vote.

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Voting site in Chicago.

The Cook County clerk’s office has created a new “trusted source” webpage that provides detailed information about election transparency and integrity.

Pat Nabong/Sun-Times

The right to vote is a fundamental liberty of our democracy, and the Cook County clerk’s office places the utmost importance on protecting and preserving that right.

Right now, one of the greatest threats to the integrity of our elections is the tremendous amount of disinformation and misinformation on websites and social media implying widespread fraud or misconduct in election operations.

Understandably, this has caused fear and confusion for many voters. That is why my office has created a new “trusted source” webpage that provides detailed information about election transparency and integrity.

The webpage has detailed FAQs to address voter concerns about allegations of election fraud as well as questions about voter identification, the processing of ballots and mail ballot drop boxes.

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There are separate, detailed sections that focus on questions about voting by mail and methods to ensure election transparency and integrity. The page also provides a list of other trusted election sources at the national, state and local levels.

The page also outlines the extensive measures the clerk’s office takes to protect the electoral process and to offer safe and accessible voting methods. Some of these measures include a voter registration process that ensures only those meeting state eligibility requirements can vote and tracks those who have cast a ballot; extensive cybersecurity protections; extended early voting; a secure vote by mail process; and secure ballot drop boxes at countywide polling locations.

The real truth is that elections are administered by state and local officials who implement numerous safeguards to protect the security of your vote, pursuant to state and federal laws and processes. As the election authority for suburban Cook County, nothing is as important as ensuring that voters have complete faith and confidence in the security of our elections.

As we approach the June 28 primary election, I strongly encourage all voters to visit our new trusted source webpage to have their questions and concerns answered and to learn details about the many facets of the elections process.

Knowledge is power and an educated voter is the key component to meaningful participation in our voting process.

Karen A. Yarbrough, Cook County clerk

Limit school doors? Remember Our Lady of the Angels fire

A number of Republicans have suggested that one way to make schools safer is to limit the number of doors to a school.

To those who think this is a good idea, I would direct them to the recent article regarding the return of the statue of the Blessed Virgin to the site of the Our Lady of the Angels School fire that killed 92 children and three nuns, due to an insufficient number of exits.

Anyone who knows of that horrible fire should be appalled at the ignorance and irresponsibility of such a “safety” suggestion.

Jim Tomczyk, Forest Glen

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