Afternoon Edition: Aug. 10, 2021

Today’s update is a 5-minute read that will brief you on the day’s biggest stories.

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A Chicago police procession drives by the Cook County Medical Examiner’s Office early Sunday. The procession was in honor of Officer Ella French, who was shot and killed Saturday night.

Tyler LaRiviere/Sun-Times

Good afternoon. Here’s the latest news you need to know in Chicago. It’s about a 5-minute read that will brief you on today’s biggest stories.

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Afternoon Edition

Chicago’s most important news of the day, delivered every weekday afternoon. Plus, a bonus issue on Saturdays that dives into the city’s storied history.

This afternoon will be mostly sunny with a high near 93 degrees and heat index values as high as 106. A heat advisory currently in effect will end at 7 p.m. tonight with temps expected to dip to a low of 76. Tomorrow will be mostly sunny with a chance of thunderstorms and a high near 91.

Top story

Police radio calls show frantic effort to save Chicago cop’s life. ‘Start compressions, start breathing, whatever we got to do. Start it now.’

An unconscious Chicago police officer lay dying in the backseat of a squad car, the officer next to her trying to keep her alive with chest compressions as they raced to a hospital.

A dispatcher radioed over and over the intersections that needed to be cleared to speed their way to the University of Chicago Medical Center.

Behind them, a police helicopter hovered over an intersection in West Englewood where the officer and her partner had been badly shot. The scene was growing with flashing lights as supervisors asked for more and more help with a third suspect still at large.

For the moment, though, the dispatcher focused his attention on Officer Ella French in the backseat.

“OK, listen to me, take that damn vest off right now and start compressions,” he told the officers in the car. “Start breathing, whatever we got to do. Start it now. While you’re driving, the officer in the back with her, take the vest off and start compressions now.”

Police radio calls provide a gripping account of the frantic moments after the officers were shot during a traffic stop shortly after 9 p.m. Saturday at 63rd Street and Bell Avenue.

Directing much of that response was a dispatcher who stayed on the air for more than three hours, sending out ambulances, positioning cars in a wide perimeter to close off the scene, even helping a helicopter pilot spot officers on the ground.

Manny Ramos has more from the radio calls here.

More news you need

  1. Brothers Emonte and Eric Morgan were ordered held without bail today as they face a litany of felony charges in the Saturday shooting that killed French and wounded her partner. Emonte Morgan told investigators “that he admitted to drinking and to possessing a gun in the front of his waistband,” said Cook County Assistant State’s Attorney James Murphy.
  2. Socialist aldermen today fired back against colleagues’ assertions that progressive politics are to blame for French’s death. It was part of the public finger-pointing by Chicago officials following recent high-profile shootings.
  3. Former Ald. Ricardo Muñoz is expected to enter a guilty plea in his federal fraud case next month. Federal prosecutors allege Munoz used a caucus he once led as a personal piggy bank.
  4. The former CEO of a Schaumburg tech firm appears set to become the first Illinoisan to plead guilty to federal charges in connection with the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, records show. The feds have so far charged at least 13 Illinoisans in connection with the insurrection.
  5. A newborn was hospitalized in good condition after being found in a dresser drawer in an alley in Montclare this morning. He was taken in good condition to Lurie Children’s Hospital.
  6. The city opened six cooling centers today as heat index figures pushed above 105. In addition to the cooling centers, you can also chill out in any CPL location — just be sure you bring your mask with you.
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A bright one

Chicago chef Maya-Camille Broussard ready for the competition on ‘Bake Squad’

South Side-based chef Maya-Camille Broussard appreciates the opportunity to showcase her talents on “Bake Squad,” the Netflix series that premieres tomorrow.

Broussard is no stranger to the stage, as her theater background will attest. Her father, the late trial attorney Stephen Broussard, was a community theater actor with ETA Creative Arts Foundation, a South Chicago-based performance and training organization, and she holds theater degrees from Howard and Northwestern Universities.

The series, which features four bakers competing to see whose dessert will be chosen for someone’s special event, is hosted by Milk Bar owner and chef Christina Tosi.

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South Side-based chef Maya-Camille Broussard is one of four bakers competing on the Netflix series “Bake Squad.”

Netflix

On “Bake Squad,” Broussard said she wants to show anything is possible for young Black and brown girls.

“I’m grateful for the show. Obviously, it gives me and my brand another level of visibility,” she said. “What’s more important is — I hope this doesn’t sound corny — I want someone to see me on the show and say: ‘Oh, she’s hard of hearing, and her speech is perfect.’ Well I’ve had speech therapy for years and years, so I may not have the classic Chicago accent all the time. … I want primarily Black and brown girls — people living with disabilities — to be inspired by my story, my tenacity, drive and success. … When people see me shine on TV, I want them to see me shine through the lens of a Black woman living with a disability — and doing it well.”

Evan F. Moorehas more from his conversation with Maya-Camille Broussard here.

From the press box

Your daily question ☕

On a scorching hot summer day like today, what’s the best way to stay cool in Chicago?

Reply to this email (please include your first name and where you live) and we might feature your answer in the next Afternoon Edition.

Yesterday, we asked you: The Tokyo Olympics ended last night. What was your favorite moment from the Summer Games? Here’s what some of you said...

“Enjoyed all parts but especially enjoyed women’s basketball. Dawn Staley is an amazing coach and she had very strong players to coach.” —Anne Walker

“Simone Biles putting herself and her mental health first and not putting herself or her teammates at risk. Glad MyKayla Skinner and Jade Carey each got another opportunity to earn medals when they stepped in for Simone.” — Felicia Marie

“The women’s track and field, volleyball. Molly Seidel, who won the marathon. The handing over the next Olympics from Toyko to Paris. The 4x400M men’s track and field.” — Andrea Fulgham

“It was thrilling when the 18-year-old Tunisian Ahmed Hafnaoui won the swimming event from the outermost lane. Really a great surprise!” —Patti Joyce

“When Lydia Jacoby, from Alaska, won the swimming event; when Alessandra Perilli, from San Marino, won that country’s first medal; and when Hidilyn Diaz, from the Philippines, won the country’s first gold.” — Jeffrey Hart

“It was thrilling when Puerto Rico won the gold medal.” — Judy Hernandez

“It has to be, for me, Allyson Felix winning her record 11 medals in track and field, becoming the most decorated Olympic track star ever.” — Maurice Snell

“One of my favorites was the two high jumpers (Italy and Qatar) deciding to share the gold medal instead of having a jump off.” — Alan Anton

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