clock menu more-arrow no yes

Natalie Moore is a reporter for WBEZ/Chicago Public Radio.

Filed under:

Surviving COVID-19 has done nothing to ease my anxiety in this new year

Watching people flaunt their vacations and gatherings on social media, despite the pandemic, bothers me more than it probably should.

Filed under:

The enduring message on home ownership of ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’

Watching is a holiday ritual. The film preaches that generosity prevails over greed, and home ownership for the working class is essential despite the obstacles.

Filed under:

What I learned about choosing the best kindergarten for my daughter

Sometimes the best schools aren’t the ones with the brand names — and the application process doesn’t have to be like "The Hunger Games."

Filed under:

A good corner store — or even a dollar store — can be a godsend during a pandemic

The best ones are well-stocked, well-lit and upend conventional wisdom about what you might find on the South and West Sides.

Filed under:

When two cities bleed into one

If your life isn’t being interrupted by long-term systemic problems of race and economic inequity, you can order a rare steak, sip a martini and be content. Segregation rewards.

Filed under:

My dreams of a birthday celebration, deferred by COVID-19

I imagined summer sunshine renewing Chicago, with no more hibernation. Instead, the coronavirus has imposed an unwelcome interlude in our lives, with no end in sight.

Filed under:

COLUMNA: Antes de llamar a la policía, intentemos conocer mejor a nuestros vecinos

Llamar a la policía es el último recurso para mí. El peligro inminente, no cualquier inconveniente, debería ser el estándar para hacerlo.

Filed under:

Before calling the cops, we might try getting to know our neighbors better

Beckoning the police is a last resort for me. Imminent danger is the standard.

Filed under:

On this Juneteenth, I’m resting up for the work ahead

A global pandemic that disproportionately affects Black people is colliding with a racism that has persisted since the first Africans stepped on this country’s shores. It’s a lot to process.

Filed under:

Why did 53% of white women vote for Trump? The story of Phyllis Schlafly tells why

The culture wars of the 1970s, explored in "Mrs. America," a television drama on Hulu, continue to this day.