Bears’ Matt Nagy: ‘No ego’ about play-calling duty, but change not needed

As the Bears’ offense continues to be one of the NFL’s worst, Nagy doesn’t think scheme is the issue.

SHARE Bears’ Matt Nagy: ‘No ego’ about play-calling duty, but change not needed
Matt Nagy was hired in large part because of his ability as a play caller and still believes in his scheme.

Matt Nagy was hired in large part because of his ability as a play caller and still believes in his scheme.

Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images

With his offense sitting 28th in scoring and 30th in total yardage, Bears coach Matt Nagy said play calling is not the problem.

He spent much of Monday morning analyzing the many failures on that side of the ball during a 17-7 loss to the Rams and came away believing that, aside from “a few plays,” he liked the calls he made.

Like most offensive-minded head coaches, he doesn’t seem inclined to give up that role at this point.

“If there’s things in the scheme that the other team is getting you or it’s not there, I’ll be the first to tell you,” Nagy said. “Then we need to be better... I have zero ego and I have zero care of giving play-call duties to somebody else.

“I really do not care about that, and if that’s what we feel like from going through it... then I would do that, I really would.”

Nagy has been a play caller since 2017, when he did so as the Chiefs offensive coordinator under Andy Reid. His success launched him into head-coaching candidacy.

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