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The Sun-Times’ position-by-position guide to the Bears’ draft needs

We spent all month breaking down the Bears to gauge their needs in the NFL Draft, which starts Thursday.

College Football Playoff Semifinal at the Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl - LSU v Oklahoma
LSU safety Grant Delpit celebrates the Tigers’ Peach Bowl title.
Photo by Carmen Mandato/Getty Images

The Sun-Times’ Patrick Finley, Jason Lieser and Mark Potash spent all month breaking down the Bears to gauge their needs in the NFL draft, which starts Thursday.

Here’s a look at the Bears, position-by-position:

Offense

Quarterback: The Bears don’t have a sure-fire 2021 starter on their roster, so they can’t rule out taking a passer in Round 2. The best three quarterbacks available figure to be Georgia’s Jake Fromm, Washington’s Jacob Eason and Oklahoma’s Jalen Hurts.

Running back: The team’s top pick last year, David Montgomery, didn’t shine the way it expected — but that might have been more of an indictment of Matt Nagy’s scheme. The Bears don’t figure to be in the market for a running back.

Wide receiver: With one of the best receiver draft crops in decades, the Bears could use a second-round pick to find what’s eluded them: a running mate for star Allen Robinson. They could find a starter in Round 2 or depth in the later rounds. Or both.

Tight end: The Bears’ need for help at tight end was obvious even before they dumped Trey Burton last week. They have quantity at tight end — but need quality.

Offensive line: The Bears have thrown money at their offensive line the past few years, but the way to fix it is to spend draft picks. The second round is the place to find a starter at guard or a potential long-term fix at tackle.

Defense

Defensive line: More than at any other spot on their team, the Bears are set at defensive line — even if it might be tempting to give position coach Jay Rodgers another project.

Outside linebacker: Khalil Mack is the reason the Bears don’t have a first-round pick — and it’s a good one. The Bears, then, won’t shop for an edge rusher until Day 3.

Inside linebacker: When the Bears decided to re-sign Danny Trevathan, they ensured that they’d have the same starting tandem for at least the next two years. Any inside linebacker they draft would be a depth piece behind Trevathan and Roquan Smith.

Cornerback: The Bears cut Prince Amukamara more than two months ago, and still haven’t found his replacement. A cornerback who can start in 2020 could be the team’s top priority entering the draft.

Safety: LSU’s Grant Delpit and Minnesota’s Antoine Winfield Jr. make sense for the Bears if they decide to use a second-round pick to unseat safety Deon Bush.