At customers’ behest, South Shore grocery requiring face masks for all who enter

Local Market Foods on Wednesday began requiring everyone — customers and staff — to wear some form of facial covering before entering the store.

SHARE At customers’ behest, South Shore grocery requiring face masks for all who enter
Local Market Foods, 2101 E. 71st St. in South Shore.

Local Market Foods in the South Shore neighborhood is requiring customers to cover their nose and mouth while shopping.

Sam Charles/Sun-Times

There’s a new layer of health safety in place at a South Shore grocery store.

As of Wednesday morning, Local Market Foods, 2101 E. 71st St., required everyone — customers and staff — to wear some form of facial covering before entering the store.

Eddie Roque, the store’s general manager, said the decision was made based on requests from customers themselves.

“The safer the better,” said Roque, who said his store is the first in the city to require such a measure.

“The customers are the ones more pushing for it,” he added. “Customers are the ones who asked us to sell masks weeks ago.”

Roque said the store and its 150-person staff hadn’t had to turn away any mask-less customers as of Wednesday afternoon, though some had forgotten their face coverings in their vehicles. If they didn’t have anything to shield their nose and mouth, they were referred to the front of the store where face coverings are offered for sale.

For $23.99, customers can buy a five-pack of N95 respirator masks. In recent weeks, the store has started offering disposable gloves to shoppers, as well.

The few dozen customers in the store Wednesday afternoon all had their face covered.

One shopper, who wished to be identified only as Elizabeth, said she appreciated the policy because “they’re taking protective measures to protect the patrons of the store.”

Last week, the towns of Glenview, Cicero and Skokie began requiring patrons and staff of all essential businesses to also wear masks. Several more suburbs have since imposed similar rules.

The Latest
Northwestern University is trying to win over neighbors with plans to bring concerts to the home of the Wildcats.
For a $500 monthly stipend, council members offer communities a step toward policing reform.
There are many factors driving the 122 candidates’ desire to become part of the grand experiment of civilian oversight at the grassroots level. Two major camps have emerged: Police supporters determined to take the shackles off officers and those who believe CPD has victimized communities of color and don’t trust police.
Police warn residents to take precautions as three of the people were struck on the head with a gun.