Archdiocese limits funerals to 10 people due to coronavirus concerns

Additionally, no physical contact is allowed at any time during the funeral, the Archdiocese said.

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The cross atop of the Archdiocese of Chicago is seen on January 2, 2019.

The cross atop of the Archdiocese of Chicago is seen on January 2, 2019.

Kamil Krzaczynski/AFP via Getty Images

The Archdiocese of Chicago is limiting funeral attendance to 10 people as the coronavirus continues to spread across the city.

The restriction follows Center for Disease Control recommendations that no more than 10 people should gather at a time.

The Archdiocese said the attendees must also be immediate family members. Other new restrictions dictate that the Mass must take place in a church and attendees stand at least six feet apart.

Additionally, no physical contact is allowed at any time during the funeral, the Archdiocese said. Holy Communion will also be done in the hand.

The same restrictions apply to wakes, viewings and burials, the Archdiocese said, and no pre- or post-service gatherings are allowed on parish property.

On Tuesday, 61-year-old Patricia Frieson of Auburn-Gresham became the first Illinois resident to die of coronavirus.

“…Another one of these things that’s terrible is that when you talk about even having a memorial service, we’re kind of handcuffed,” her brother, Anthony Frieson, said. “You can’t have large gatherings. For family out of town, travel is restricted.”

Contributing: Maudlyne Ihejirika

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