Life after coronavirus: How do you think it will be different post-pandemic? We asked, you answered.

More online schooling. No more hugging or handshakes. Much more working from home. Temperature scans before being allowed into sporting events. Those were some of the answers.

SHARE Life after coronavirus: How do you think it will be different post-pandemic? We asked, you answered.
Two people with improvised face masks walk past signs of encouragement in Lincoln Square.

Two people with improvised face masks walk past signs of encouragement in Lincoln Square.

Tyler LaRiviere / Sun-Times

Just as 9/11 changed the world in lasting ways, the coronavirus pandemic is sure to change certain aspects of everyday life even after it’s over.

We asked how Chicagoans think life will be different. These were among the answers. Some have been condensed and lightly edited for clarity.

“I think there will be an air of caution for quite some time. I don’t see people feeling comfortable in a crowd anytime soon. I think activities will have to happen in different ways than we have ever experienced.” — Sandy Robertson

“I am hoping people have better health and hygiene. Also, we really need to revamp the healthcare system. Maybe now that we know the healthcare field will always need people, more will lean towards that way for their careers.” — Eric Boyd

“Businesses will still struggle and end up closing with no help from our local government. The saying ‘we’re in this together’will become ‘you’re in it alone.’” — Charna Halpern

“I certainly hope people will be more neighborly, friendly, prayerful, helpful, loving, kind, truthful, honest and forgiving if necessary.” — Alice Nicholson

“Initially: overcrowding. Then: anxiety, depression and PTSD through the roof. Hopefully a more health and hygiene conscious population.” — Jessica V. Cortés-Negrón

“People will definitely think twice about putting their elderly family members in nursing homes. I would never consider that after living through this pandemic.” — Patrick Bryant

“It’s going to be really hard to return to brick-and-mortar schools.” — Derrick Provall Sr.

“I certainly hope people will be more neighborly, friendly, prayerful, helpful, loving, kind, truthful, honest and forgiving if necessary.” — Alice Nicholson

“We’ll be more self-centered and tribal, viewing strangers even more suspiciously than before.” — Tony De Castro

“People are going to be very skeptical of how they interact with others as far as shaking hands, fist bumps and most definitely standoffish in conversations.” — Eric D. Brown

“I’m hopeful that people will be kinder to each other.” — Lindsay Lawson

“Hopefully, the way people treat each other. This virus is teaching us how not to take the little things for granted.” — Azell Edwards

“For the 50,000+ people who have lost a loved one, their lives will be much different forever.” — John Hrynkow

“I’ll focus more on living a good life.” — Cheryl Jackson

“Traffic will return to being awful, and we will all be 30 pounds heavier.” — Erron Fisher

“Hopefully, there will be a new president.” — Chuck Cerveny

“Lots of families will be missing relatives, and many small businesses will be filing for bankruptcy.” — Glenn Portwood

“I pray I’m here to see it. I will want to continue to work from home so I can save gas and the time I spent wondering what to wear.” — Sharon D. Lewis

“People that can work from home now will largely expect to continue that into the future.” — Sam White

“Along with metal detectors at airports, arenas, schools, etc., there will be temperature scans to see if you have a fever before entering the venue.” — Roni Schmidt

“No more hugging, handshakes.” — Joe Espinosa

“Men will actually really wash their hands at the airport bathroom ... with soap!” — Jim Bennett

“I really don’t think it will very much different. People are simple creatures.” — Charles Hayes

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